Showing posts with label - - - HHH - HAIKU. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - - HHH - HAIKU. Show all posts

22/07/2013

Jonangu Toba Fushimi

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Joonanguu 城南宮 Jonan-Gu, Jonangu Shrine


During the Heian period, the deity to protect the country from evil was enshrined in this shrine. It was located in the South of the capital, and its deity is famous for protecting the "four courners".
Fushimi, Kyoto - 京都市伏見区中島鳥羽離宮町 7

This shrine is famous for its various festivals according to old tradtions.

quote
Jonan-gu
is in the area that was under the peaceful rule of Emperor Toba.
It was a strategic gateway to the ancient capital of Heian-kyo (now Kyoto). It was also a beautiful riverside scenic spot on the Kamogawa River.
... Thus, it was seen as a prosperous sub-capital at the heart of culture and government over a period spanning more than 150 years of the emperors and ex-emperors.

Before departing on their pilgrimages, the nobility prayed for safe journey along the way as well as purifying themselves by abstaining from eating meat. In particular, the Ex-emperors, Shirakawa and Toba often chose Jonan-gu as a spiritual place to start their pilgrimages to Kumano. They would seclude themselves and do purificiation rites for seven days before departing on the pilgrimage of devotion which took a full month for the roundtrip. In those times, many people chose Jonan-gu because it impressed people with its lodgings, and it was believed that Jonan-gu was a suitable place to start from for a religious journey.
source : 99oji.blogspot.jp

Reference : http://www.jonangu.com/


- - - - - observance kigo for late autumn - - - - -

Joonan matsuri 城南祭 Jonan Festival
..... Joonanjin matsuri 城南神祭  Festival for the Jonan Deity
Third Sunday in October



This shrine is also called Mahataki Jinja 真幡寸神社.
On the festival day three mikoshi portable shrines decorated with Pine, Bamboo and Plum (Shoochikubai) are carried around in a large procession in the evening.
In former times there were also horse races and shooting competitions (Jonan yabusame).


腹あしき僧も餅くへ城南神
hara ashiki soo mo mochi ku e Joonanjin

even the mean monks
come to eat rice cakes -
God of Jonan


Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村

hara ashi 腹悪し to be mean, malicious


. Yakuyoke 厄除け amulets to ward off evil .



. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

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Tobadono, Toba Dono 鳥羽殿 Toba Imperial Retreat villa
Toba Rikkyuu 鳥羽離宮  Toba Palace
Fushimi, Kyoto


quote
Buson, one of the great poets of haiku of the late eighteenth century, was in fact very much a studio or desk poet. He composed his poetry at home, in his study, and he often wrote about other worlds, particularly the tenth and eleventh century Heian aristocratic world and the subsequent medieval period. One of his most famous historical poems is

鳥羽殿へ五六騎急ぐ野分かな
Tobadono e gorokki isogu nowaki kana

To Toba palace
5 or 6 horsemen hurry
autumn tempest


probably composed in 1776.
Toba palace, which immediately sets this in the Heian or early medieval period, was an imperial villa that the Cloistered Emperor Shirakawa (1053 - 1129) constructed near Kyoto in the eleventh century and that subsequently became the location of a number of political and military conspiracies. The galloping horsemen are probably warriors on some emergency mission - a sense of turmoil and urgency embodied in the season word of autumn tempest (nowaki).
An American equivalent might be something like the Confederate cavalry at Gettysburg during the Civil War or the militia at Lexington during the American revolution. The hokku creates a powerful atmosphere and a larger sense of narrative, like a scene from a medieval military epic or from a picture scroll.
source : Haruo Shirane - Beyond the Haiku Moment



quote
To the Toba Imperial villa,
Hurrying five or six mounted warriors
In a typhoon of early autumn.


Nobody reads the Haiku without picturing a scene in his mind readily. The Haiku has three elements that arouse our sense of weirdness, uneasiness, and gloomy foreboding.
One is 'Tobadono', which stands for government by a retired emperor, with the possibility of political disturbance.
Another is 'mounted warriors', which represents a disquieting behavior or a riot.
The last is 'a typhoon in the early autumn', in which the first two climax as psychological suggestion of political turmoil, or a civil war. Besides, an autumnal typhoon is associated with a long severe winter.
Here in this respect, there is no substitute of the season word for 'a typhoon in the early autumn'. In the Haiku, fiction plays a very important role, but many agree that it ranks among his best haiku poems.
source : www.hokuoto77.com




To Toba's Hall
five or six horsemen hurry hard --
a storm-wind of the fall!

Tr. Henderson


To the castle of Toba
five or six horses hurrying
in the autumn storm

Tr. Sawa and Shiffert


to Toba Palace
five or six horsemen hurry --
an autumn gale

Tr. Ueda

The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.

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連哥(れんが)してもどる夜鳥羽の蛙哉
renga shite modoru yo Toba no kawazu kana

after composing linked verse
on the way home at Toba
the frogs . . .

Tr. Gabi Greve

The cut marker KANA is at the end of line 3.

. WKD : Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 in Edo .

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quote
The Battle of Toba-Fushimi (鳥羽・伏見の戦い, Toba-Fushimi no Tatakai)
occurred between pro-Imperial and Tokugawa shogunate forces during the Boshin War in Japan. The battle started on 27 January 1868 (or Keiō-4 year, 1-month, 3-day, according to the Japanese calendar), when the forces of the Tokugawa shogunate and the allied forces of Chōshū, Satsuma and Tosa Domains clashed near Fushimi, Kyoto.
The battle lasted for four days, ending in a decisive defeat for the Tokugawa shogunate.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -


source : turbobf1516


雁さわぐ鳥羽の田面や寒の雨
kari sawagu Toba no tazura ya kan no ame

geese clamoring
on rice fields at Toba—
frigid rain

Tr. Barnhill

Written in 元禄4年, Basho age 48.

. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 - Archives of the WKD .


Basho makes an allusion to a waka by the Tendai priest Jien 慈円 (1155 - 1225):

大江山傾く月の影さへて
鳥羽田の面に落つる雁がね


Ooeyama katamuku tsuki no kage saete
Toba ta no moto ni otsuru kari gane

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. Clay Dolls from Fushimi - 伏見土人形 .

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10/07/2013

shinza - seat of the deity

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shinza 神座 / 神籬 seat of the deity, divine seat, divine throne

It can be a real throne, or a sacred mountain or aother item where the deity can reside.


source : takaoka.zening.info

seated male deity 男神座像 at the shrine Futagami Imizu Jinja 二上射水神社 in Toyama
富山県高岡市の二上山南麓


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quote
Shinza
The place within a shrine where symbols of the kami (mitamashiro) are enshrined.

In Shrine Shinto, a building is constructed as a place to worship the kami. Within that building a shinza is established, decorated in a manner appropriate for a dwelling of the kami, and furnished with an object (called a shintai) representing the presence of the kami.

Accordingly, the form that the shinza takes may vary widely depending on the architectural style of the shrine's sanctuary (honden). In shrines of
the shinmeizukuri style, the preferred type of shinza is called ontamanai;
in the nagarezukuri style, the michōdai type is suitable, and
in the gongenzukuri style, the otoku type is appropriate.

The term ontamanai can also be written with characters meaning "a jewel is present," indicating a beautiful seat for the kami. Four pillars are built on bases set in each of the four corners, and these four pillars in turn support a decorated roof. Representative examples include the Grand Shrines of Ise, the Atsuta Shrine, and other shrines in the shinmeizukuri style.

The michōdai style consists of a raised seat surrounded by a screen and is based on the same structure found in the main rooms of shindenzukuri-style dwellings built by Heian-period nobles. Many shrines are constructed in this style.

The otoku style originates with the mitana (storage cabinets) used in the food-preparation room (mizushidokoro) of the palace. The divine seat here takes the form of a cabinet with two doors that open to the front. Examples include those found at Kashima Jingū and Dazaifu Tenmangū.
Other styles of shinza are also called takamikura, hirashiki, daishōji, omiya, and shin'yo.
source : Okada Yoshiyuki, Kokugakuin


Since the Japanese tenno 天皇 Tenno was considered a deity, his resting places are included.


Exhibition of Takamikura and Michodai


daishooji 大床子
hinoomashi 昼後座(ひのおまし)
hirashiki 平敷
mitamashiro, mitama-shiro 御霊代
michoodai 御帳台 Michodai
mitana 御棚 "honorable shelf"
omiya 御宮
ontamanai 御玉奈井(おんたまない)
otoku 御櫝(おとく)
shinyo 神輿 - mikoshi portable shrine
shintai 神体 "body of the deity", for example Mount Fuji, Fujisan 富士山
shooji 床子(しょうじ) throne with four legs
takamikura 高御座 "throne for the deity (Tenno)"



. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .



michoodai 御帳台 Michodai, micho-dai, "throne for the deity" or for the Emperor or Empress
a nobleman's room for living or sleeping


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quote
In Shinto, shintai (神体, body of the kami), or go-shintai (御神体, sacred body of the kami) when the honorific prefix go- is used, are physical objects worshipped at or near Shinto shrines as repositories in which spirits or kami reside.
Shintai used in Shrine Shinto (Jinja Shinto) can be also called mitamashiro (御霊代, spirit replacement or substitute?).
In spite of what their name may suggest, shintai are not themselves part of kami, but rather just temporary repositories which make them accessible to human beings for worship.
Shintai are also of necessity yorishiro, that is objects by their very nature capable of attracting kami.

The most common shintai are man-made objects like mirrors, swords, jewels (for example comma-shaped stones called magatama), gohei (wands used during religious rites), and sculptures of kami called shinzō (神像), but they can be also natural objects such as stones, mountains, trees and waterfalls.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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神座の雪も落葉も掃かれけり
shinza no yuki mo ochiba mo hakare-keri

even from the divine seat
the snow and the fallen leaves
have to be swept


Murakami Haruki 村上春樹


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座布団を積みて神の座里神楽
zabuton o tsumite kami no za sato-kagura

the seating cushions
are piled up high at the divine seat -
Kagura dance in the village


Morio Akiko 盛生晶子


. WKD : Kagura Dance 神楽 .


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神の座を雲来て包む山開き
kami no za o kumo kite tsutsumu yamabiraki

the seat of the deity
is wrapped in clouds -
start of the climbing season


Fujitani Shie 藤谷紫映

Fujitani san has written more poems about Mount Fuji.


. WKD : yamabiraki 山開 "opening the mountain" .
start of the mountain climbing season - humanity kigo for late summer




source : hisasann.com/digital

five layers of clouds on Mount Fuji - a very special moment - June 2007 !
(The photo is a fake, it seems, but suits the poem . . .)

- CLICK HERE - for more Fuji photos -



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09/07/2013

otabisho resting point

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otabisho, o-tabisho 御旅所 / お旅所 sacred resting point


source : narajisya.blog - mahoroba
御旅所坐神社「大和稚宮神社」at Ooyamato Wakamiya Jinja, Nara



quote
Otabisho
Also called okariya or angū, a facility serving as the temporary destination or midway resting point during a kami's ritual procession (miyuki).

On the occasion of such processions, the kami's symbol is taken from its usual "seat" (shinza) in the shrine and is transferred to a portable shrine (omikoshi or shin'yo), then borne through the shrine parish district  until the procession reaches the otabisho, where rites are observed.

The otabisho is normally selected on the basis of some special relationship to the shrine and its object of worship (saijin), but it may be one of several types.

For example, some otabisho are special structures permanently dedicated for such use; in other cases, the otabisho may be an auxiliary shrine outside the main shrine's precincts (keidaichi),
or a shrine dedicated to a "consort deity" of the saijin. In still other cases, the home of a parishioner may be selected as the otabisho or a temporary structure may be built as required to serve the purpose.

In general, the traveling kami is thought to spend a predetermined period of time in the otabisho before returning to its main shrine, but the actual time spent at the temporary resting point may vary from no more than a brief stop during the procession to relatively long-term periods of enshrinement. Normally, the portable shrine used to bear the kami in the procession continues to serve as the kami's residence or divine seat during the duration of its stay at the temporary shrine.
source : Mori Mizue, Kokugakuin



. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .



Ooyamato shinkoosai 大和神幸祭 Festival at shrine Oyamato Jinja
. WKD : Festival at shrine Oyamato Jinja .


. mikoshi, o-mikoshi お神輿 and other festival floats .


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o-tabisho in the forest, where a lion dance with swords is performed to entertain the local deities.




- look at the Photo Album - Gabi Greve


. 一宮神社 Ichi no Miya Hachiman shrine in Ohaga, Okayama   .


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お旅所の夜はもろこしを焼く匂ひ
otabisho no yo wa morokoshi o yaku nioi

at night
at the sacred resting poing it smells
of grilled corn


Shimomura Hiroshi 下村ひろし



When the deity spends more time over night at the Tabisho, there is usually a night festival with a lot of food stalls.

. WKD : morokoshi もろこし maize, corn .
- toomorokoshi 玉蜀黍 - kigo for mid-autumn


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- Haiga by Nakamura Sakuo -

御旅所を吾もの顔やかたつぶり
o-tabisho o waga mono-gao ya katatsuburi

with a face
of owning the Tabisho . . .

this snail

. Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 .


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お旅所のうしろ柱は海に立つ
otabisho no ushiro hashira wa umi ni tatsu

the back pillar
of the sacred resting point
stands in the sea


Nakatogawa Asato 中戸川朝人

This could be a shrine near the sea coast.

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autumn festival -
a streak of sunshine
on the priest




Gabi Greve, Japan, 2007
the mikoshi at the o-tabisho in our woods . . .


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iwakura sacred rocks

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iwakura 岩座 / 磐座 sacred rock, sacred boulder
iwaza 岩座 "stone seat"



source : veeten/iwakura
Achi Jinja Iwakura 阿智神社磐座


quote
A formation of rocks considered to be sacred to which a kami is invited to descend for worship.

Together with ishigami (stone-kami) and iwasaka, such forms of worship represent a type of rock-worshiping cult. As rites are repeated, the rocks themselves are worshipped as divine stones.

Archaeological sites throughout Japan point show traces of such worship, with many are related to ritual worship. Such sites may be referred to by a variety of suggestive vernacular expressions including "divine descent stone," "divine sitting stone," "divine appearance stone," and "kami' footprint stone."

The size and shape of the stones also vary widely. Such sites appear to have been worshiped since the neolithic Jōmon period, as suggested by such finds as the togari-ishi ("pointed stones") of Nagano Prefecture, and the sake-ishi ("salmon stones") of northeastern Japan, but rites were more frequently observed beside rock formations starting with the Yayoi-period sites of buried bronze bells (dōtaku), and especially in the tumulus (burial mound, or kofun) period. Large caches of mirrors, stone jewels, weapons, and earthenware utensils have been found at archaeological sites, in the same state as when they were when they were abandoned.

In shrine rituals, sites of stones believed to be related to the shrine's kami (saijin) are still used as "resting sites" (otabisho) for the kami's portable shrine (shin'yo) or for the presentation of food offerings to the kami.

At shrines called iwakura jinja, rock formations may be worshiped within or behind the shrine's sanctuary (honden), suggesting that such rocks were the focus of worship even before the formal establishment of the shrine.
source : Sugiyama Shigetsugu - Kokugakuin


Iwakura Jinja 岩座神村 Iwakura Shrine
for example in Hyogo 兵庫県 多可郡 加美町


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


. iwasaka 磐境 stone altar, cairn .


Iwakura waterfall and temple Daiun-Ji 岩倉大雲寺

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In the legend, O-yama-gui-no-kami descended on a huge rock at the top of Mt. Matsuo at an ancient time, and the rock had been the religious site for local residents since then (usually this kind of holy rock is called Iwakura (磐座)).
. Matsu-no-o Taisha 松尾大社 Kyoto .


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お降りや磐座の石しめるほど
o-sagari ya iwakura no ishi shimeru hodo

first rain of the year -
just enough to wet
the divine rocks


Kawai Kazuko 河合和子

. WKD : o-sagari おさがり rain on January 1 .


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磐座は海から見えて花の雨
iwakura wa umi kara miete hana no ame

the sacred rocks
can be seen from the ocean -
rain on cherry blossoms


Ibaraki Kazuo 茨木和生
(1939 - ) Haiku poet from Nara


. WKD : "Rain on Blossoms" (hana no ame) .


At the shrine Hana no Iwaya Jinja 花窟神社 in Kumano, Mie, sacred ropes are hung from the divine rocks.


source : sakishimasuounoki.ti-da.net


O-tsunakake shinji お綱かけ神事
ritual of replacing the ropes at Hana no Iwaya Jinja
This unique rope ceremony is held twice a year in Feb. and Oct. A giant rope is suspended from a really big rock (45 m high), which forms an object of worship.
. WKD : Festivals of Mie Prefecture .



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07/07/2013

miyamori - Shrine caretaker

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miyamori, miya mori 宮守, 宮守り
shrine warden, shrine caretaker, shrine overseer

guardian of a Shinto shrine 神社の番人


. miya, guu 宮 shrine .


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

宮守よわが名を散らせ木葉川 / - - in 桜下文集
miyamori yo waga na o chirase konohagawa

宮人よ我が名を散らせ落葉川 / - - in 笈日記
miyamori yo waga na o chirase ochibagawa


shrine warden -
scatter my name
into the river of fallen leaves

Tr. Gabi Greve

This was a response to a hokku by Bokuin 谷木因 , which had made a great impression on Basho, so he felt, his own name could be "scattered among the fallen leaves in the river".

伊勢人の発句すくはん落葉川
Isebito no hokku sukuwan ochibagawa

let us hook the hokku
Ise poets left behind -
river of fallen leaves

Tr. Hideo Suzuki


Written in 1684 貞亨元年.
Basho had visited the shrine Tado Jinja 多度神社 in Kuwana, Mie to pay his respect to the Deity Tado Gongen 多度権現 and then moved on to Ogaki, to visit his friend
. Tani Bokuin 谷木因 .



source : itoyo/basho
Tado Jinja 多度神社 in Kuwana

HP of the shrine - 北伊勢大神宮
source : tadotaisya.or.jp

Tado Festival (May 4–5):
The largest of the events at the shrine, it involves young men riding horses up a hill and over a wall.
Chōchin Festival (Saturday and Sunday in late-July): A lantern festival.
Yabusame Festival (November 23): A horseback riding archery competition.
. WKD : Festivals of Kuwana .


. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 visiting Shinto Shrines .



Tado shrine 多度神社 in Gifu
built in 1573, (29 th September).
Deity in residence is Amatsu hikone no Mikoto アマツヒコネ /天津日子根命 / 天津彦根命
Son of Amaterasu.
He is the God of Rain.
- source : Aoi on facebook

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. Masaoka Shiki 正岡子規 . - - -and his miyamori haiku


宮守の賽錢ひろふ落葉かな
miyamori no saisen hirou ochiba kana

the shrine warden
picks up the money offerings
and fallen leaves . . .




宮守のはき集めたる椿かな
miyamori no haki-atsumetaru tsubaki kana

the shrine warden
rakes together
camellia blossoms . . .



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烏帽子着て加茂の宮守涼みけり
eboshi kite Kamo no miyamori suzumikeri

wearing an eboshi hat
the caretaker of Kamo shrine
looks so cool . . .






Two more about the eboshi hat by Shiki :

宮守の風折烏帽子桜散る

宮守の烏帽子直すや時鳥


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20/06/2013

shinboku - divine tree

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shinboku 神木, shinju 神樹 sacred tree, divine tree

kami no ki, kaminoki  神の木、神ノ木 tree of the deity, tree of God
go shinboku, goshinboku, go-shinboku, go-shin-boku 御神木 "honorable sacred tree"
reiboku 霊木 divine tree, "tree with a divine soul"
. moriki 杜樹 tree of a shrine .

kamisugi, kamusugi 神杉 divine cedar tree


source : s-hoshino.com
等々力渓谷の近くにある神社 at a shrine near Todoroki Keikoku Valley in Kyoto


quote
Shinboku, Shinju
Literally, "divine tree," a tree regarded as sacred, as the symbol of sacred territory or a place in which the kami dwell. When viewed in this way, the cutting or polluting of such trees is avoided. On the other hand, in some cases the term is used to denote the lumber dedicated for building shrines. During the Heian period, the sacred nature of certain trees was exploited for political ends, as when priests (jinin) of the Kasuga Shrine in Nara carried a sacred sakaki tree when making demands in Kyoto.

Since ancient times certain trees or entire groves within shrine precincts were regarded as sacred, as attested by expressions such as "the cryptomeria revered by the priest (hafuri or hōri) of Miwa," or "the sacred forest (kannabi)" (both expressions found in Man'yōshū), or from the records of Emperor Kōtoku in Nihongi, "he despised the way of the kami by felling the trees at the Ikukunitama Shrine." Sacred trees are seen frequently today, encircled by sacred border ropes (shimenawa) or enclosures.

In most cases such trees represent very old or large specimens. In other cases, certain specific trees may be linked in some way to the kami of the shrine, such as the shirushi no sugi at Kyoto's Fushimi Inari Shrine and the Ōmiwa Shrine, or the pines of the shrines Ōharano Jinja, Kitano Tenmangū and Sumiyoshi Taisha, the cryptomeria (nagi) of Kasuga Taisha and Kumano Taisha, the tataegi of the Suwa Taisha, and the "flying plum tree" (tobiume) at Dazaifu Tenmangū.
source : Sakurai Haruo, Kokugakuin 2005



Kannabi, kamunabi, iwasaka, himorogi and other names refer to a place in nature where the gods are believed to reside, a "purified place". It is also a kind of yorishiro resting place for the god.
. kannabi 神奈備 sacred forest .

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imiki, imi ki (imigi) 忌み木 "taboo tree"
忌む木
. imi 忌み / 斎み / 禁忌 imi - taboo - Introduction .

Sacred trees where deities come to reside during their travels in this world and the other.
Forest workers, charcoal makers and local villagers found special trees in the forest that were not to be cut down, because 山の神 the Deity of the Mountain resides in them. Sometimes a 天狗 Tengu uses this tree to take a rest. It they were touched improperly, that person would hurt himself, get ill and eventually die. There are many legends of this kind of punishment of the Deity.
If for some special reason a taboo tree had to be cut down, there need to be a ritual first performed by a Shinto or Buddhist priest to ask for forgiveness and understanding.

-- The following is an ABC list (to be updated) of vocabulary related to these trees:

aioi matsu アイオイマツ(相生松)"mixed pine tree"
赤松と黒松 red and black pine tree grown together, in 幡多郡十和村 Towa village, Kochi.
. bifurcated pine tree and the Takasago legend .

aogi アオギ(和名クロガネモチ / 黒鉄黐 kuroganemochi no ki)Ilex rotunda
Grows low in valleys. People often say
une no kasamatsu ni tani no aogi ウネ(尾根)の傘松に谷のアオギ Kasamatsu on the ridge and Aogi in the valley

engi エンギ(縁木)"trees bound by fate"
One tree with one more different type of 寄生 parasite
enmusubi no ki 縁結び木 Tree to come for finding a good partner (or other kind of EN)

hidarimakigi ヒダリマキギ(左巻木)"left-winding tree"
at 北川村 Kitagawa village, 安芸市上尾川 Kochi

hookigi ホーキギ(箒木)"broom tree"
The branches have the form of a broom. Often observed in mountain cherry trees 山桜 (hookizakura 箒桜), also called hotegi ホテギ.

source : kkakehi.cocolog-nifty.com/photos
For example in 十和村 - 鏡村 Towa and Kagami village, Kochi.

kasamatsu カサマツ(傘松) "umbrella pine tree"
The branches have the form of an umbrella.
In 吾川村寺村 Agawa village Teramura, Kochi, people say
山の神の性根の入った木 (the strong personality of the Mountain Deity resices here)
or 天狗の休み木 A tree where the Tengu take a rest.
. Tengu to matsu 天狗と松 Legends about the Tengu pine .


kusegi クセギ(癖木) "tree with a special habit"
A tree which grows in strange, unnatural ways. Some are quite elegant and tasteful.


madogi マドギ(窓木)"window tree"
Trees with two stems, that parted at some point and were re-united further up again.
Trees with this "window" opening facing east-west were especially auspicious.

source :blog.livedoor.jp/thbigthree/archives

yama no kami no yadorigi 山の神の止り木 / 山の神の宿り木 Yamanokami
yama no kami no yasumigi 山の神の休み木
yama no kami no oshimigi 山の神の惜み木
Also called renriboku, renrigi 連理木(れんりぼく、れんりぎ)


. Aoki アオキ / 青木 Aucuba japonica, Japanese laurel .

oyadakigi オヤダキギ(親抱き木)tree like a "parent embracing a child"
In 東律野村大古味 Tsuno willage, Okomi

. sakaki 榊 Sakaki tree, Cleyera japonica .

sashieda サシエダ(差し枝)tree with very long branches
In 北川村 Kitagawa village, Kochi.

shakujoogi シャクヂョーギ(錫杖木)"walking staff tree"
The stem is parted in the middle like a walking staff.
In 香北町 Kahoku village, Kochi.

Tengu no tomarigi テングノトマリギ(天狗のとまり木)a tree where Tengu take a rest
Their legends are handed down in the villages. If someone tries to cut a tree town, he will be flipped in the air or falls under the tree.
At night such a tree sometimes makes a loud, painful sound, or falls down all by itself 天狗の倒し木 (tree cut down by a Tengu),
If villagers check in the morning, sometimes there is nothing special to be seen.

toriigi トリイギ(鳥居木) Torii tree
Tree grown in the form of a Torii Shinto gate.
In Yamanashi this tree is used by the Deity of the Mountain or a Tengu.
Sometimes a tree falls down by itself. Villagers then cut some branches and ask the deities to enjoy them instead.

tsurugi ツルギ / tsurigi ツリギ tree with two branches growing together 癒着.
tsurugi, tsurugu means 交合 copulation in the local dialect of 池川町椿山、十和村 Towa village, Kochi.

yutoo ユトー(湯桶)tree like an earthen pot
in 土佐山村 Tosayama village, Kochi. The branches look like 土瓶の取手 the handle of a dobin pot.


- reference : geocities.jp/kyoketu -
- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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. WKD : ki, jumoku 木 - 樹木 .


. tachikibutsu 立木仏 trees with carved Buddha statues .  

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source : Michihito on facebook
at 大阪の門真市

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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

神木は釘を打れて時雨けり
shinboku wa kugi o utarete shigure keri

a nail pounding
into sacred wood...
winter rain

Tr. Lanoue



shimboku wa kugi o utarete shigurekeri

a god's tree --
as a nail is hammered in
it drops cold rain

Tr. Chris Drake

This winter hokku is from the 10th month (November) of 1823, five months after Issa's wife Kiku died and two months before his ailing infant son Konzaburo will die. The hokku is about someone doing what is called "nailing a curse during the hour of the cow (1 a.m.-3 a.m.)." The most sacred time in Shinto is the middle of the night, when most of the important secret ceremonies are carried out, and curses were also popularly believed to be more powerful if made at that time, though they had nothing to do with Shinto. Those who made the curses, however, dressed in white pilgrim's robes, put candles on round holders on their heads, and wore other clothes as if they were doing austerities. The person making the curse secretly goes to a Shinto shrine between 1 and 3 a.m. night after night until s/he believes the curse is beginning to take effect. The curse itself is made by nailing a straw doll in the shape of the person being cursed to the trunk of a tree at a shrine with a long five-inch nail. Something owned by the person can also nailed to the tree.
The "god's tree" here could refer to any tree within precincts of the shrine, although in some contexts it means the tree-body of a god. Since a tree embodying a god usually had a fence or sacred barrier around it and was hard to approach, I take this to be an ordinary shrine tree sacred to the god.

In the hokku someone goes stealthily into the precincts of a Shinto shrine well after midnight and nails a straw doll to a shrine tree with a long iron nail, no doubt driving the nail through an area of the doll that would be fatal if actually driven through the person the doll represents. However, Issa evokes the tree responding to the nail as if to punish the person making the curse. The hard hammering shakes the tree and causes the nearly freezing raindrops still on its limbs after a day and evening of passing showers to fall down. Cold raindrops soak the nailer's head, perhaps putting out the candles s/he is wearing.

Chris Drake
. WKD : Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 in Edo .





. Wara ningyoo 藁人形 straw dolls for curses .
At midnight, a nail is hit through the heart of the doll to fix it to a tree in a shrine.
ushi mitsu, the old double-hour of the ox beginning at one o'clock. mitsu signifies the third part of this time slot.

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宿木も共に神木小鳥来る
yadorigi mo tomo ni shinboku kotori kuru

the mistletoe too
is part of the divine tree -
small birds come here


Kawasaki Keiko 川崎桂子

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神木を遊び場にして鴉の子
shinboku o asobiba ni shite karasu no ko

this divine tree
is the playground
for baby crows


Takazawa Ryooichi 高澤良一 Takazawa Ryoichi


. karasu no ko 鴉の子 children of the crow, baby crow .
kigo for all summer


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注連さげし杉の神木花粉撒く
shime sageshi sugi no shinboku kafun maku

the sacred cedar tree
with the sacred rope
scatters its pollen . . .


Murakami Tatsuyoshi 村上辰良


. WKD : sugi no kafun 杉の花粉 cedar pollen .
kigo for late spring


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神木も倒して隠岐の野分かな
shinboku mo taoshite Oki no nowaki kana

this typhoon
has even blown down the divine tree
at Oki island


Yoshikawa Umeko 吉川梅子


. WKD : nowaki 野分 "parting the fields" "field-dividing" wind, "field-divider" typhoon .
kigo for mid-autumn


Oki Islands (隠岐諸島, Oki-shotō, or 隠岐群島 Oki-guntō)
are a group of islands in the southwestern part of the Sea of Japan and belong to Japan.
Already under the Nara period the islands were used as an exile for persons from the mainland.
From the Kamakura period the islands were administrated as "Oki no kuni" (Oki Province) and primarily governed by the shugo (governor) from Izumo Province.
Under the Edo period the Tokugawa family took control over the islands and they were put under the direct control of the Shogun through a governor. Later they became part of the Matsue Domain. During that time the islands were a stopover point for trading boats traveling to and from Asia.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


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天の木といふ涼しさの未来より
ten no ki to iu suzushisa no mirai yori

coolness
called a celestial tree
from the future

Tr. Fay Aoyagi

Sanuka Masami 佐怒賀政美


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餅焼いて神木の箸こがしけり
mochi yaite shinboku no hashi kogashikeri

as I grill rice cakes
the chopsticks of divine wood
get burned . . .


Suzuki Yaeko 鈴木ヤエコ



Hinoki wood chopsticks from Ise Shrine

Some shrines, especially the Grand Shrine at Ise, prepare special chopsticks from the divine trees for rituals or sell them as amulets to people.

. Ise Jinguu (伊勢神宮 Ise Jingu, Ise Grand Shrine .


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kamisugi, kamusugi 神杉 divine pine tree



神杉や三百年の蔦紅葉
kamisugi ya sanbyakunen no tsuta momiji

divine pine trees -
and the red leaves of ivy
for three hundred years


. Masaoka Shiki 正岡子規 visiting Nikko 日光 .


The tsuta vines are fond of old pine trees and like to grow around them.
. WKD : tsuta momiji 蔦紅葉 red leaves of Japanese ivy .


. Matsuo Basho in Nikko .

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神の杉ましろき藤をかけにけり 岸風三楼 往来
神の杉焦げんばかりにどんと燃ゆ 大坂十縫
神杉に沿ひ昇る日やほととぎす 柳沢仙渡子
神杉に礫のごとし初雀 安川幸里
神杉に耳あててみる盆休み 朝妻力
神杉に谺し雪のびんざさら 伊藤いと子

神杉のもとに庖丁始の儀 黒田晃世
神杉の上をとびゆく滝しぶき 栗山渓村
神杉の千年の黙冷まじや 森戸光子
神杉の太根を頼み雪残る 林 翔
神杉の実の真青なる手向山 福井貞子
神杉の年縄寂ぶる若葉雨 中村祐子
神杉の明暗負ひて種下ろす 有働亨
神杉の根を踏み虞る梅雨豊前 井口荘子
神杉の樹齢を仰ぐ淑気かな 東 天紅
神杉の百尺に夏来たりけり 小村陽子
神杉の秀へ火の粉舞ふ八朔祭 佐藤栄美
神杉の秀を押上ぐる大初日 村上誠子
神杉の葉を添へて売る三輪暦 大島民郎

神杉やあまりちひさき秋の蝶 高橋淡路女

神杉を射て砕けたる初日かな 稲岡長
神杉を少し揺さぶり風光る 稲畑廣太郎
神杉を突いて鉄砲宮相撲 茨木和生

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

shinboku 神木 legends
Yamanokami no yadorigi 山の神さんの宿り木 sacred tree for Yamanokami
- collecting -


................................................................................ Gifu 岐阜県

Yamanokami likes the following trees
-- madogi マドギ "window tree" - trees with two stems
-- hookigi ホウキギ broom tree / Kochia scoparia
-- kamoeda カモエダ
These trees are not to be cut down.



................................................................................ Gunma 群馬県
.......................................................................
利根郡 みなかみ町

The following trees are know as trees where Tengu take a rest:
「峰の三つ股、沢の二股」
A tree with three main stems on the top of a mountain and a tree with two main stems near a swamp are sacred to Yamanokami.
These trees are also sacred to Yamanokami in Ibaraki 茨城県.




................................................................................ Fukui 福井県
.......................................................................
三方郡 Mikata district 美浜町 Mihama

In the forest using trees for making charcoal, the biggest tree is 山の神さんの宿り木 sacred to the Yamanokami and never cut down.

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遠敷郡 Onyu district 名田庄村 Natasho

山の神のケヤキの木 Keyaki tree of Yamanokami
Once there was a sacred tree in the mountain forest.
Once a man tried to cut it down, but he heard a loud voice:
"Do not cut this tree! If you cut it your wife will have a severe accident!"
He did not listen to this warning and cut the tree anyway.
When he came home he found his wife on the kitchen floor with a deep cut wound in her leg.

. Yamanokami legends from Fukui .


source : hitozato-kyoboku.com/mikawa-yamanokami-keyaki...
A sacred Keyaki tree in Yamagata 山形県東田川郡三川町押切新田

. keyaki 欅と伝説 Legends about the Zelkova tree .




................................................................................ Fukushima 福島県
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耶麻郡 Yama district 高郷村 Takasato mura

. hoo no ki 朴の木 Magnolia hypoleuca tree .




................................................................................ Ibaraki 茨城県

. yadorigi 宿り木 in many villages .




................................................................................ Iwate 岩手県
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軽米町 Karumai

. sugi no tatari 杉の祟り curse of the Japanese cedar tree .



................................................................................ Kanagawa 神奈川県

. Yamanokami and Tengu trees .



................................................................................ Kagoshima 鹿児島県

. Yamanokami trees .



................................................................................ Kochi 高知県

. Yamanokami 山の神 - 榊 Sakaki tree .

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幡多郡 Hata district // 吾川村 Agawa village // 土佐郡 Tosa district // 中村市 Nakamura // 宿毛市 Sukumo // 高岡郡 Takaoka district

madogi 窓木(マドギ)"window tree"
Sacred to Yamanokami. They may not be cut down to make charcoal.





................................................................................ Saitama 埼玉県
比企郡 Hiki district

. enoki 榎木 / 榎 nettle tree .
Celtis sinensis var. japonica.
武州比企郡鎌形村の農万右衛門の家で、享保末頃のある夏の日の午後、木の枕のようなものが突然家の中に転げ込んできたのを下女が怖がり、庭の榎木の空洞の中に入ってしまった。人々が空洞の中を探しても何も見つからなかったが、後にこの木を伐り倒そうとすると、木から血が流れて止まらなかったので中止したという。

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
88 神木 to explore (00)

. Yamanokami no ki 山の神の木 The Tree of Yamanokami .
Legends from Ehime
28 山の神の木 (02)

. 山の神さんの宿り木 - Fukushima .
山の神の止まり木


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- #shinboku #iminoki #shinju
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04/06/2013

Hongan-Ji Temple

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Honganji 本願寺 Hongan-Ji, Hongwanji
Temple of the Primal Vow of Buddha Amida

quote
the collective name of the largest school of Jōdo Shinshū Buddhism (which further sub-divides into the Nishi and Higashi branches). 'Hongan-ji' may also refer to any one of several actual temple buildings associated with the sect.


Higashi Hongan-Ji, Kyoto

The Hongan-ji was established as a temple in 1321, on the site of the Otani Mausoleum, where Shinran, the founder of the Jōdo Shinshū (True Pure Land) sect was buried. The mausoleum was attended by Shinran's grandson (through daughter Kakushinni), Kakue. Kakue's own son, Kakunyo, became the first chief priest of the Hongan-ji and 3rd Monshu, and dedicated it to the worship of Amida Buddha. The Hongan-ji first gained power and importance in the 15th century, when Rennyo became its eighth chief priest, or Monshu. However, the Tendai sect, based on Mount Hiei, saw this expansion as a threat and attacked the Hongan-ji three times with their army of warrior monks. Rennyo fled to Yoshizaki, where he established a new temple compound.

During the Sengoku period, fearing the power of the monks of the Hongan-ji, Oda Nobunaga tried to destroy it. For ten years, he laid siege to the Ishiyama Hongan-ji in Osaka, one of the two primary temple fortresses of the sect.

In 1602, just after Tokugawa Ieyasu became Shogun, he declared that the Hongan-ji be split in two. Kyonyo, the 12th chief priest, or monshu, of Hongan-ji became the first of the new
Higashi Honganji (東本願寺), or Eastern Temple of the Primal Vow, while his younger brother Junnyo became the 12th chief priest of the original Hompa-Honganji (本派本願寺), or
Western Temple of the Primal Vow, often called Nishi Honganji (西本願寺).
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !


. Namu Amida Butsu 南無阿弥陀仏 The Amida Prayer.


- - - - - HP of the Hongan-Ji temples in Japan and the World
Ishiyama Hongwanji
the twenty-first monshu, Myonyo
- source : hongwanji.or.jp -

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- - - - - at Nishi Hongan-Ji 西本願寺

Hiunkaku 飛雲閣,
a large tea pavilion, containing four Noh stages, one of which is thought to be the oldest in existence and the other being the largest outdoor Noh stage, and the Kokei no Niwa (虎渓の庭) garden.



- quote -
Hiunkaku 飛雲閣 Lit. flying cloud tower
Unique, three-storied timber building, roukaku 楼閣, built in asymmetrical design and located on the grounds of Nishihonganji 西本願寺 in Kyoto. Traditionally, it was believed to have belonged to Jurakudai 聚楽第 (built between 1584-86) for pleasure and entertainment, according to the wishes of Toyotomi Hideyoshi 豊臣秀吉 (1536-98), and transferred to Nishihonganji (c.1619). However, at present, many scholars think it more probable that Hiunkaku was built at about the same time the garden, Tekisuien 滴翠園, between 1624-44. It is situated in the southeast corner of the temple precinct and faces a pond called Sourouike 滄浪池 Soro-Ike (blue wave pond). A boat can carry visitors across the pond and anchor beneath the first story of the building. Steps are provided to climb up to the first floor. There is an undulating gable roof over the boat entrance and the water can be seen from the open translucent sliding screens shouji 障子.
Another access to the Hiunkaku is over a long stone slab bridge. Its length on the north & south sides of the bridge is 25.8m, the east side is 11.8m and the west, 12.5m. The first story interior is in the shoin style shoin-zukuri 書院造, with the study facing the pond. The study has two levels of floor space, of which the higher level has three mats. The study is called the Shoukenden 招賢殿 (invitation to wisdom hall) and has 7 1/2 mats with 2 1/2 mats in the alcove. Next to the study is the Hakkei-no-ma 八景の間 (a room of eight scenes), a veranda, and a tea ceremony room called Ikujaku 憶昔 (recalling old times).
The second story has a Kasen-no-ma 歌仙の間 (room of great poets), named after The Thirty-six Immortal Poets Sanjuurokkasen 三十六歌仙 painted on the wooden doors and walls. It also has a raised and lower level floor. There is a lightly railed veranda around the second story.
The third story, excluding a stair landing, is only eight mats in size. Katoumado 火灯窓 (ogee shaped windows) are on the north and east sides. Shouji with diamond-shaped latticework are covered with translucent paper. The paneled ceiling has paper pasted and gold leaf pressed on it. All the building's roofs are shingled kokerabuki 柿葺.
The first story roof has an undulating gable karahafu 唐破風, on one side, and on the opposite, northwest side, a hip-and-gable arrangement irimoya-zukuri 入母屋造.
The second story has a convex hip-and-gable roof with undulating bargeboards on three sides.
The third story has a pyramidal roof hougyou-zukuri 宝形造.
- source : JAANUS -

kaku 閣 2-storied structure in a garden.
Something that is more splendid and elegant than an arbor or a simple pavilion.
The three most famous KAKU
----- the Golden Pavilion, Kinkaku 金閣
----- the Silver Pavilion, Ginkaku 銀閣
----- the Flying Cloud Pavillion, Hiunkaku 飛雲閣

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- - - - - kigo related to some famous persons

. Kakunyo Ki 覚如忌 Memorial Day for Saint Kakunyo .
文永7年12月28日(1271年2月9日) - 正平6年/観応2年1月19日(1351年2月15日)
He was the first chief priest of the Temple Hongan-ji, Kyoto.



. Shinran Ki 親鸞忌 Memorial Day for Saint Shinran .
Goshoo-Ki 御正忌 Memorial Services at Temple Hongan-Ji
Betsuji Nenbutsu-E 別時念仏会 Nenbutsu prayer Service for Shinran Shoonin
Otorikoshi 御取越  (おとりこし) "Passing into the New Year"
November 22 till 28. 28 is the death memorial day.

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. Kubutsu Ki 句仏忌 Kubutsu Memorial Day .
Ootani Kuubutsu 大谷句仏 Otani Kubutsu / Ootani Kooen 大谷光演 Otani Koen
February 6. 1875年(明治8年)2月27日 - 1943年(昭和18年)2月6日)
Priest at Higashi Honganji, Kyoto. Haiku poet.

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. Rennyo Ki 蓮如忌 Rennyo Memorial Day .
(1415-1499) 8th abbot of Hongan-Ji



Rennyo (蓮如) (1415–1499)
was the 8th Monshu 門主, or head-priest, of the Honganji Temple of the Jōdo Shinshū sect of Buddhism, and descendant of founder Shinran. Jodo Shinshu Buddhists often referred to as the restorer of the sect (Chūkō no so (中興の祖) in Japanese).
He was also known as Shinshō-in (信証院), and posthumously Etō Daishi (慧灯大師).
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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chuukei 中啓 Chukei, ceremonial fan of a priest


CLICK for more photos !

Many shine in brilliant silver and gold color coating.
It is not used to fan for fresh air, but sometimes hit to make a sound.
Sometimes it can be opened and a rosary or sutra book placed on it during ceremonies when sitting on Tatami mats.
This fan can also be placed in the collar when both hands are needed.

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木々もめを開らくやみだの本願寺
kigi mo me o hiraku ya mida no honganji

the tree buds, too
open up...
Amida's Hongan Temple

Tr. David Lanoue



春風や越後下りの本願寺
harukaze ya echigo kudari no honganji

spring breeze--
going down to Echigo's
Hongan Temple

Tr. David Lanoue

Saint Shinran spent some time in exile in Echigo.
On the way, when Shinran had to go to exile in Echigo in 1207, there was this pine where he sat down to rest, along the "beach road" 浜街道. There was a whole pine grove at the time of Sain Shinran.
The tree is maybe 500 years old.



西へちるさくらやみだの本願寺
nishi e chiru sakura ya mida no honganji

to the west
cherry blossoms scatter...
Amida's Hongan Temple


When Issa composed this haiku, early in Ninth Month of 1822, he was paying visits to some of his haiku students in Naganuma, a village in his home province of Shinano, present-day Nagano Prefecture--and so the poem must be either a memory or a pure invention. In fact, in his journal he prefaces it with the head-note, "Spring"-- underscoring the fact that this haiku, composed in autumn, doesn't pretend to depict a scene that the poet could have witnessed at the time.
He could be referring, then, to either one of the Kyoto temples or to a Honganji of Edo (today's Tokyo), where he spent much of his young adult life.
There are at least four Hongan temples: two in Kyoto (Higashi Honganji and Nishi Honganji) and two in Tokyo (Higashi Honganji and Nishi Honganji).
Tr. and comment : David Lanoue



鬼茨もなびくやみだの本願寺
onibara mo nabiku ya mida no honganji

even the thorn bush
bows low!
Amida's Hongan Temple

Tr. David Lanoue


. WKD : Kobayashi Issa 小林一茶 in Edo .

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It is customary for the Monto 門徒 of Hongan-Ji to come for the Year-end cleaning, whipping all the tatami to get the dust out. This important event is usually featured in the TV news.



本願寺二百三畳冴返る
Hongan-Ji nihyaku sanjoo sae-kaeru

at Honganji
there are 203 Tatami mats -
cold comes back


稲垣美知子 Inagaki Michiko

. sae kaeru 冴返る cold comes back .
- kigo for spring -

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本願寺畳叩いて年用意
Honganji tatami tataite toshi yooi

Honganji -
beating the Tatami
preparing for New Year


吉川能生 Yoshikawa Hisao


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本願寺 憩う人なき 大銀杏

Hongan-ji temple,
no one rests under
the big ginkgo tree


West Hongann-ji


本願寺 北堀凉し 夏の鯉

Hongan-ji temple,
north moat is cool
summer carps


East Hongan-ji

- Shared by Naotaka Uematsu -
Haiku Culture Magazine, 2013


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31/05/2013

saijoo ritual site

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saijoo, saijō 斎場 ritual site

1. - the site of a religious service
2. - soogijoo 〔葬儀場〕 a funeral hall


quote
Saijō
A general term for a ritual site, or any place where the enshrinement of a kami or the performance of ritual worship takes place. At Shinto shrines, the facility may be called either a saijōin or saijōsho, and may be represented by either a permanent or temporary structure. In the case of the ritual Daijōsai or "Grand Festival of Firstfruits" held at the beginning of a new emperor's reign, the term saijō was used to refer to the entire complex of buildings and facilities constructed for the presentation of new grain and other sacred offerings (shinsen) which were immediately dismantled following completion of the rituals.

At the Yoshida shrine in Kyoto, a facility surrounding the shrine's "great temple of origins" (Daigenkyū) was constructed as a saijōsho, and in the Edo period, this site contained the Hasshinden, a shrine to eight kami for the protection of the imperial person and originally under the aegis of the Ministry of Divinities (Jingikan).
The Daigenkyū was an octagonal structure with a thatched roof, dedicated to a kami called Daigensonshin (considered the Great kami of Ultimate Origins). Surrounding this central shrine were other shrines dedicated to 3132 kami listed in Engishiki, together with others dedicated to the Inner (Naikū) and Outer (Gekū) shrines of the Grand Shrines of Ise. Altogether, this complex represented the main ritual sanctuary of the Yoshida Shinto school.

source : Yumiyama Tatsuya, Kokugakuin



. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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Seefa utaki, Seiha no Utaki 斎場御嶽 - 斎場御獄 (せーふぁうたき/サイハノうたき)
Sefa Utaki in Okinawa


quote
Sefa-utaki (斎場御嶽), meaning "purified place of Utaki,"
is a Shinto Shrine. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Gusuku Sites and Related Properties of the Kingdom of Ryukyu in Nanjō, Okinawa.

The site is located on a densely forested hillside along the ocean and features several rock formations, which are connected with each other by walking trails.



Sefa Utaki on Chinen Peninsula has been recognized as a sacred place since the earliest period of Okinawan history. The shrine area itself comprises a number of caves and overhanging ledges opening to the east and south among towering rock formations of a high promontory over the sea.

Although regarded as a powerful spiritual site beforehand, it was in the early 16th century that Sefa Utaki came into prominence. During this period the Okinawan religion underwent reorganization and centralization under the royal government, and Sefa Utaki became one of the main locations for religious ceremonies and rituals. Reflecting the strong connection between the royal family and the religion, the sites for prayers at Sefa Utaki were named after important places in Shuri Castle.

All buildings have been destroyed, but the outer and inner precincts can still be traced.
© More in the WIKIPEDIA !

世界遺産 斎場御嶽(せーふぁうたき) - Viedo
source : www.youtube.com



斎場御獄 蝶蜂蝉の死にどころ
Sefa Utaki choo hachi semi no shinidokoro

Sefa Utaki -
a place to die
for butterflies, bees and cicadas


Yamada Haruo 山田春生






斎場御獄 砲弾痕に井守棲む
Sefa Utaki hoodan ato ni iimori sumu

Sefa Utaki -
in the traces of cannonballs
some newts are living


Kobayashi Tokie 小林登喜枝

The region was involved in the fighting during World War II.


. WKD : imori 井守 (いもり) newt, eft, kind of salamander .
kigo for all summer


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斎場の木の一本に囀れり
saijoo no ki no ippon ni saezureri

at the funeral hall
on just one tree
birds are chirping


Sasaki Rokka 佐々木六戈 (1955 - )


. WKD : saezuri 囀 twittering of birds, chirping, warbling .
kigo for spring

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斎場の森に鴬老知らず
saijoo no mori ni uguisu oi shirazu

the nightingale
in the forest of the ritual site
does never get old


- - - - - or

the nightingale
in the forest of the funeral site
does never get old


Nakamura Teiji 中村悌二


. WKD : Nightingale, bush warbler (uguisu 鴬).
there is a kigo for summer, when the best time for the nightingale seems over :
"old nightingale", old bush warbler, oi uguisu 老鶯
..... roo oo 老鶯
uguisu oi o naku 鶯老を鳴 the nightingale cries of old age


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秋晴や斎場へ道まつすぐに
akibare ya saijoo e michi massugu ni

fine autumn weather -
the way to the ritual site
in a straight line


Uchida Misa 内田美紗


. WKD : akibare 秋晴 (あきばれ) fine weather in autumn .


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