Showing posts with label - - - HHH - HAIKU. Show all posts
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26/11/2015

Unagihime Jinja Yufuin

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Unagihime Jinja 宇奈岐日女神社 Unagi-Hime Shrine
also read Unaguhime, Unagu-Hime (うなぐひめじんじゃ/うなきひめじんじゃ)
2220 Yufuincho Kawakami, Yufu, Oita / 大分県由布市湯布院町川上2220

Yufu Jinja 木綿神社(ゆふじんじゃ) / Yufusan Jinja 木綿山神社


CLICK for more photos !


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Rokusho-Gu 六所宮
The shrine is known as "Rokusho-sama" or the respectful six gods and it now enshrines six Shinto gods.
The proper name is of the shrine is "Unagi-hime Jinja Shrine", but this lady god Unagi or Princess Eel is not included in the six gods.
People of Yufuin have been struggling with water. Our ancestors might have worshiped eel as a spirit of marshes and created this shrine.
Rokushogu use to have a fairly wide precincts and from there, trees were repeatedly cut down for special usages. A historical document records that in late 16th century, when Samurai lord "Otomo Yoshimune" ruled the area, the shrine offered the trees to built great "Yusuhara Hachiman Shrine", the first shrine of the Bungo area in Oita city.
In 1991, Super Typhoon Mireille knocked down all the huge cedars here and you can see the enshrined stumps now.



Ogo-Sha 大杵社 (Oogosha)
Ogo-sha is a subordinate of Unagi-hime Shrine and was established around the same period.
So it may go back to the age of mythological Emperor Keiko.
The great cedar tree of this shrine was designated as a national important cultural asset in 1934. It measures 13.5 m around the base and 35 m high and is more than 1000 years old.
Near the roots is a cavity around 5 m2. In the new year's eve of 1897, fire got into this cavity and it continued to burn for 2 years 2 month and 2 days. People say they saw smokes gashing out from the top part 30 m up in the sky.
Every body thought the tree was killed. However it gained power after this incident.
Maybe the pests were swept out by the fire and smoke.
- source : yufuin.or.jp/global

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- - - - - Deities in residence:

Kunitokotashi no Mikoto 国常立尊 (くにとこたちのみこと)
Kunisatsuchi no Mikoto 国狭槌尊 (くにさつちのみこと)
Hikohohodemi no Mikoto 彦火火出見尊 (ひこほほでみのみこと)
Hikonagisatake Ugayabukiaezu no Mikoto 彦波瀲武鸕鷀草葺不合尊 (ひこなぎさたけうがやふきあえずのみこと)

Kamu Yamato Iwarehiko no mikoto 神倭磐余彦尊 (初代神武天皇)Jinmu Tenno
Kamununakawahihi no mikoto 神渟名川耳尊 (かむぬなかわみみのみこと、第2代綏靖天皇)Suizei Tenno

社伝によれば、創祀は景行天皇12年10月であるという。『神社明細帳』では、景行天皇が征西のおりに当地で祭を営んだといい、同天皇3年に速津姫が勅を奉じて創祀したという伝承を伝える。
当社
は由布岳の南西山麓に鎮座している。『太宰管内志』では「木綿山にます神なので木綿ノ神社ともいう」という記述があるほか、『豊後国志』でも宇奈岐日女神は由布山神であると記されており、元々は由布岳を神体山として成立した神社であると見られている。
江戸時代までは佛山寺と習合していた.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

Lake Kinrinko 金鱗湖 Lake Fish Scales
Legend knows that Unagihime made a bet with an Oni demon that he could not build 100 steps up to her seat on the top of Mount Yufudake or make 100 boulder heaps (or throw 100 large boulders or earth in the area in one night ... sources differ).
Anyway then a rooster announced the morning and the job was not finished. The demon had to leave the area. But there was enough earth in the plain to make place for the farmers to grow crops and the lake had become much smaller.



The lake Kinrinko used to be full of unagi ウナギ(鰻)eel, which were the sacred fish of the deity, and even made into the Deity Unagi Hime herself.

Other legends tell this story of Unagi Hime and the Oni named
Kesaki Gongen 蹴裂権現(けさきごんげん)
He tore a rift in the mountains so that the water of the huge lake could flow out . . . and thus the plain of Yufuin was created.



A statue of Kesaki Gongen is very small, only about as long as a hand.
It was kept in the shrine, but after the buildings were lost in a typhoon, there is now just a small sanctuary in the woods, where no-one visits any more.
A local villager takes the statue home to offer prayers during the winter time. He also shows it to the school children and tells them the old story.

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- quote -
Kamuyamatoiwarebiko (Kamu Yamato Iwarebiko)
Other names: Kamuyamato iwarebiko hohodemi no sumera mikoto, Wakamikenu no mikoto, Toyomikenu no mikoto, Sano mikoto, Hatsukuni shirasu sumera mikoto.

Names referring to the first legendary emperor Jinmu.
The fourth child of Ugayafukiaezu and Tamayorihime (daughter of the sea kami Watatsumi; see also umi no kami). Jinmu originally married Ahirahime [in Nihongi, called Ahiratsuhime] in Hyuga, thus siring Tagishimimi no mikoto. Later, he conferred with Itsuse no mikoto and his other brothers and left on a campaign to subdue the eastern provinces. Both Kojiki and Nihongi relate the eastern campaign while interspersing martial songs called Kume-uta.

Hosted by Usatsuhiko and Usatsuhime, and guided by the kunitsukami Shinetsuhiko, the army passed through the provinces of Tsukushi, Toyo, Aki, and Kibi, finally arriving at Naniwa (near present-day Osaka). The army failed to land there, however, and changed course and proceeded instead to Kumano. During that period, the campaign was successful at subjugating the various tribes met, but in the fight with Tomi no Nagasunebiko (in Kojiki), Jinmu's brother Itsuse no mikoto was killed, and Inahi no mikoto (in Nihongi, Inai no mikoto) and Mikenu no mikoto (in Nihongi, Mikeirinu no mikoto) were buffeted by storms at sea and either drowned or departed to the "everlasting land" (Tokoyo), finally leaving Emperor Jinmu as the sole leader.

At Kumano, Jinmu's army was beset by noxious vapors issued by rough kami, and the entire band fell unconscious, but they were saved by the local man Takakuraji, who received an oracular dream from Amaterasu and Takemikazuchi. With the sword Futsu no mitama provided by Takemikazuchi, Jinmu defeated the rough kami.

When the army lost its way on the road, either Takamimusuhi (Kojiki) or Amaterasu (Nihongi) appeared to Jinmu in a dream, telling him to follow the numinous Yatakarasu crow that would be sent as a guide. Following the crow, Jinmu and his army, led by Michi no omi no mikoto arrived at Yoshino, where they were met by the kunitsukami Ihika (in Nihongi, called Ihikari), Iwaoshiwaku, and the child of Niemotsu. There, Jinmu orchestrated the surrender or defeat of the brothers Ukashi the Elder and Ukashi the Younger, the brothers Shiki the Elder and Shiki the Younger, the leaders Yasotakeru and Nagasunehiko, and the Tsuchigumo peoples.

Finally, in his role as the child of the heavenly kami (amatsukami), Jinmu consulted with Nigihayahi no mikoto who had rendered service in subduing local kami like Nagasunehiko, and after receiving Nigihayahi's submission, he completed his eastern campaign and built a palace at Kashihara, where he was coronated.

The account in Nihongi also introduces numerous other episodes involving the campaign to subject the indigenous tribes, including the appearance of a golden kite (a bird of prey); and Jinmu's receipt of an oracular dream, as the result of which he makes ritual implements from the clay of Mt. Amanokagu. These implements he offered in worship to Takamimusuhi in performance of an oath (ukei), appointing Michi no omi to the position of chief ceremonialist.

Following his coronation, Jinmu, through the mediation of Ōkume no mikoto, took as his empress Himetataraisukeyorihime, the child of Mishima no Ōmononushi and the daughter of Mishima no Mizokui. With her, he produced Kamununakawamimi no mikoto and other offspring, and at Torimiyama he constructed a facility for the worship of the imperial ancestral kami. According to Kojiki, he lived to be 127, and died at Kashihara and was buried to the north of the mountain Unebiyama.
- source : Mori Mizue, Kokugakuin 2005 -


. Jinmu Tenno 神武天皇, Jimmu, the first Emperor of Japan .

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visitor's stamp of the shrine 宇奈岐日女神社 朱印

豊後国大野郡の俵積神社には、宇奈岐日古 が祀られているらしい。
- Look at more photos.
- source : genbu.net/data/bungo/unaguhime -

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Yufuin Onsen 湯布院温泉 Yufuin Hot Spring

- quote -
Yufuin (由布院 as onsen resort, 湯布院 as city)
is a popular hot spring resort, located about ten kilometers inland from Beppu, another, much larger and more developed hot spring resort. Yufuin has a wealth of art museums, cafes and boutiques, and many travelers come to the city just to stroll about town for the day.

Yufuin is located on a flat river basin surrounded by mountains. The most prominent feature of Yufuin's skyline is the twin peaked Mount Yufu (由布岳 Yufudake), which hovers over the town and serves as the backdrop for many scenic views. The area is rural and shortly after leaving the main walking route, travelers will come across the rice paddies and farm houses that make up a considerable part of the town.

The ryokan and hotels of Yufuin are spread out around town, and not clustered along the main street like in many other resort towns. Instead, the main street is lined with cafes, boutiques and small museums, giving Yufuin an atmosphere more like a trendy shopping area than a traditional onsen town. Nonetheless, there is a large number of lodgings with hot spring baths, some of which open their baths to non-staying guests during daytime.



Another natural landmark of Yufuin besides Mount Yufu is Lake Kinrinko (金鱗湖) lit. "Golden Scale Lake".
The water temperature of this lake annually stays same, because of several brooks pouring in and hot spring gushes in the lake.
When the air temperature is lower than water temperature, you can see evaporating fog coming out of surface and the scene turns into a fantastic mood.
In this lake are fish such as tilapia (originated in Africa), crucian carp, carp and other freshwater fish. Legend say, Lake Kinrinko was much bigger in old days, but several landslides that occurred with earthquake made the lake smaller and shallower.
The lake was named by a Confucian scholar Kuso Mori in 1884, who saw the scales of crucian carp shine in gold. It literally means Golden scale Lake.

The small lake is located at the end of the town's main walking route, about a kilometer and a half from the station. Walking paths surround the lake as well as more small shops and cafes, and there is a small shrine located at the lake's southern end. There are also a few public bath houses, one of which, the Shitanyu, can be used by tourists, while the others are for use by local residents only.

Below is a list of some of Yufuin's best baths: - snip -
- source : japan-guide.com -


The hot springs that abound in the town of Yufuin are divided into three distinct areas.

1. Yufuin Hot Springs (由布院温泉):
These springs are situated near the base of Mt. Yufu. Their plentiful flow of hot water and quiet mountain surroundings have long attracted writers and artists to the area. Currently, these springs are ranked with the second highest water flow in Japan, and their combination of natural environments with forward-thinking urban development have made Yufuin Hot Springs a top health resort destination, drawing visitors from all over Japan.

2.Yunohira Hot Springs (湯平温泉):
It has long been said that these springs are effective in treating gastrointestinal disorders. The nearby stone-paved road, built during the Edo period, suits the atmosphere of the Yunohira Hot Springs, with their history as therapeutic baths.
The Haiku Poet Santoka spent some time here.

3. Tsukahara Hot Springs (塚原温泉):
It is said that this secluded spring located north of Mt. Yufu has been flowing since the Heian period. Tsukahara Hot Spring is recognized as one of the three major medicinal baths of Japan, and its strong acidic pH of 1.4 is reputed to be especially effective against skin diseases.
- source : jnto.go.jp/eng/location -

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. unagi 鰻 / うなぎ eel, Aal .

. Taneda Santooka 種田山頭火 Taneda Santoka (1882-1940) .

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- Reference : 宇奈岐日女神社
- Reference : English


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
- #unagihimejinja #yufuin -
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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

. Yufudake 由布岳 Mount Yufudake and Haiku .


由布岳や白く化粧しお出迎え
Yufudake ya shiroku keshoo shi o-demukae

you welcome us
with a white makeup -
Mount Yufudake

source : shikata.exblog.jp

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秋天に神の彫りたる由布二峰
shuuten ni kami no horitaru Yufu jihoo

in the autumn sky
the Gods have carved
two peaks of Yufudake


田村木国 Tamura Mokkoku (1889 - 1964)
from Wakayama
published Haiku sōwa in 1947




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- #unagihime #kinrinko #lakekinrin -
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31/01/2015

miko shrine maiden

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miko 巫女 shrine maiden, female shrine attendant
kannagi 巫女 (かんなぎ)
okorago 御子良子 shrine maidens at Ise Shrine




- quote
A general term for a woman possessing the magico-religious power to receive oracles (takusen) from the kami in a state of spirit possession (kamigakari). Nowadays the term generally refers to a woman who assists shrine priests in ritual or clerical work. The word may be written with various characters (巫女、神子、巫子). Among miko there is a significant distinction between those female priests who have historically been attached to a shrine and those who are separate from shrines and either are settled in a village or travel the countryside as magical kitōshi (see kitō). Under the ritsuryō system, in the Jingikan female priests were called mikannagi, while they were called mikanko in the Shoku Nihongi.

In the Wakun no shiori, miko is described as the general term, while female norito performers are referred to as mikanko, and it further explains that miko can be written with different characters. The etymology of the word is unclear, but it may be an abbreviated expression of kamiko, the substance (monozane) in or upon which the kami manifests itself. It can also be thought of as a transformation of the honorific term miko (御子), indicating spiritual power and high birth.

In the past, a variety of related positions were found at different shrines: miyanome at Ōmiwasha, sōnoichi at Atsuta Jingū, itsukiko at Matsuno'o Taisha, monoimi at Kashima Jingū, naishi at Itsukushima Jinja, waka at Shiogama Jinja, and nyobettō at Ideha Jinja (Hagurosan). In ancient times miko acted as ritualists for the kami who possessed magical capabilities, as in the examples of Amenouzume no mikoto, Yamato totohi momoso hime no mikoto, Yamato hime no mikoto, and Empress Jingū. Eventually, however, male kannushi, hafuri, and negi took their place, and miko came to be placed in roles assisting these male ritualists, according to one theory.

Peregrinating and settled miko may be seen historically nationwide, performing magic and kitō (invocations of divine power) or transmitting the words of the dead. These unaffiliated miko exerted a great influence on folk religion and the verbal arts. Such women who serve miko-like functions may still be observed in some areas, and women performing similar functions may also be found in Shinto-derived new religions.
- source : Kokugakuin, Nishimuta Takao



. Autumn Festival in Sakai, Okayama .


- quote
A miko (巫女) is a Shinto term of Japan, indicating a shrine (jinja) maiden or a supplementary priestess who was once likely seen as a shaman but in modern Japanese culture is understood to be an institutionalized role in daily shrine life, trained to perform tasks, ranging from sacred cleansing to performing the Kagura, a sacred dance.
- Physical description
- Definition
- History of Mikoism
- Contemporary miko
. . . The ethnologist Kunio Yanagita (1875–1962), who first studied Japanese female shamans, differentiated them into
jinja miko (神社巫女 or "shrine shamans") who dance with bells and participate in yudate (湯立て or "boiling water") rituals,
kuchiyose miko (口寄せ巫女 or "spirit medium shamans") (itako いたこ) who speak on behalf of the deceased, and
kami uba (神姥 or "god women") who engage in cult worship and invocations (for instance, the Tenrikyo founder Nakayama Miki). . . .
- Miko in popular culture
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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miko suzu, mikosuzu  巫女鈴 ritual bells of a Miko

. . . CLICK here for Photos !

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巫女鈴 - 17th century ~ Miwa, Nara Prefecture.
The rare suzu contains twelve barrel-shaped crotal bells. A five-lobed metal hand guard with flower motifs and openwork hearts bears a hidden inscription on its underside. It reveals the history and use of the instrument, stating that this Shinto instrument was used by miko (a supplementary priestess) Kuriyama Kamiko for the worship of the Miwa Miyojin deity at Miwa, a town in Soe County, Nara Prefecture. It also bears a date of 1699.



The term suzu refers to two Japanese instruments associated with Shinto ritual:
a round, hollow bell that contains pellets, having a slit on one side or a handheld bell-tree with small crotal bells strung in three levels on a wire. It is said that ringing them calls kami, allowing one to acquire positive power and authority, while repelling evil. A set of bells used in Kagura dance (神楽, "god-entertainment") is called Kagura suzu (神楽鈴, "divine entertainment bells").
Suzu come in many sizes, ranging from tiny ones on good luck charms to large ones at shrine entrances.
- source : facebook

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- Reference : 日本語

- Reference : English


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -


source : www.isekitamikado.com
MIKO 中世の巫女(みこ)



御子良子の一本ゆかし梅の花 
okorago no hitomoto yukashi ume no hana

the shrine maidens
with just one lone tree
of plum blossoms

Tr. Gabi Greve


. Matsuo Basho 松尾芭蕉 .
at Ise Jingu 伊勢神宮 Grand Shrine at Ise


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巫女に狐恋する夜寒かな
kannagi ni kitsune koi suru yosamu kana

Shrine-maidens are
Much loved by foxes
In the cold of night.

Tr. McAuley


河内路や東風 吹き送る巫が袖
kawachiji ya kochi fuki okuru miko ga sode

Kawachi Road -
the east wind in spring blows
the sleeves of shrine maidens

Tr. Gabi Greve




巫女町によききぬすます卯月かな
miko machi ni yoki kinu sumasu uzuki kana

Where the shrine maidens dwell
They're washing out their summer clothes:
The Fourth Month is here!

Tr. McAuley


At the shrine maidens' street
ceremonial robes being washed --
early summer.

Tr. Sawa/ Shiffert

The road from Yodo to Kawachi. Now part of Osaka.

. Yosa Buson 与謝蕪村 .
(1715-1783)

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神主のまはりの落葉巫女も掃く
中里北水

木犀や社家の子ゆゑの巫女づとめ
西村数

禰宜吶々巫女蝶々畳替
神尾季羊

舟で来る菖蒲祭の禰宜と巫女
井原久子

巫女が行き花嫁が行く夏木立 小堀紀子
巫女だまりより蒲公英の絮飛べり 飯森茂之
巫女だまり火の熾りゐる淑気かな 中野彰一
巫女となる一と間とざせり寒紅梅 中戸川朝人
巫女に吹く住吉の風の寒の風 米沢吾亦紅
巫女に恋したりままこのしりぬぐひ 加藤三七子
巫女に見ゆ乙女のうれひ花うつぎ 亀井糸游

巫女のみごとりてより春の闇 飯田蛇笏
巫女の初髪吉備津結びなる 細川子生
巫女の剣佩きたる雪月夜 飯田蛇笏 霊芝
巫女の手は衣にかくす里神楽 斉藤夏風
巫女の指細し病葉拾ふとき 原川雀
巫女の振る鈴に白露の闇動く 江田居半
巫女の掌に蚕神(おしら)遊ぶや旱り熔岩 角川源義
巫女の秘む幼き恋や龍の玉 中山輝鈴
巫女の緋は春の水皺に綾なせる 阿部みどり女
巫女の舞ふ鈴の音とほる青茅の輪 池田博子
巫女の舞ふ鈴より春の寒さかな 石山民谷
巫女の袖触れし天神花を享く 後藤比奈夫
巫女の鈴こだまとなりて杜小春 石川規矩子
巫女の鈴りりちりち砂灼けにける 伊藤敬子
巫女の髪水引を懸け神迎 安西閑山寺
巫女の髪解かずに下向革コート 河野頼人
巫女の髪髪切虫が切りに来し 村上冬燕

巫女ひとりゐる大宮の芦の絮 北山春子
巫女ふたり打つ七草のせりなづな 蒲幾美
巫女も出て陽明門の煤払ふ 鈴木朗月
巫女も持つ時代祭の長刀を 岸風三楼 往来
巫女ゆききして玉虫の育つ森 神尾久美子
巫女より郭公やさし六地蔵 文挟夫佐恵 雨 月
巫女をおろしてしのぶ文字ずり良夜かな 加藤郁乎
巫女一つづつ雲丹海に雲丹供養 上甲明石
巫女囃子遠くにリラの花匂ふ 西村公鳳
巫女市の霧大粒に湖わたる 角川源義
巫女市霊界に柵めぐらして 三好潤子
巫女溜りはなやいでゐる雛納め 鈴木智子
巫女町のあかつき起や萩が花 妻木 松瀬青々
巫女白し炭をつかみし手をそゝぐ 前田普羅

巫女舞の扇の先の青嶺かな 佐野典子
巫女舞の稽古の日々や神無月 岩城鹿水
巫女舞の稽古はじめや楠若葉 堀井より子
巫女舞の花をうながす足拍子 伊藤京子
巫女舞は注連の几帳にかくれつゝ 高浜虚子
巫女舞を見せられ屠蘇に酔ひにけり 小路紫峡

Many more haiku about the miko
- source : HAIKUreikuDB

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Suzuki Harunobu 鈴木晴信 (1725 - 1770)


巫女の髪麻で束ねて更衣
miko no kami asa de tabanete koromogae

the hair of the Miko
is bound by a hemp string -
changing of the robes


永岡好友 Nagaoka Yoshitomo (1939 - )

. koromogae 更衣 changing of the robes .
- kigo for summer -

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
115 to explore

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- #miko #shrinemaiden -
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30/08/2014

Yakubyogami

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Yakubyoogami 疫病神 Yakubyogami, Deity of Diseases
eyami no kami えやみのかみ gyooyakujin 行疫神 gyoyakujin
ekijin, yakujin 疫神

A deity that brings epidemic diseases.
It was feared a lot, since there was no medicine for empdemic diseases in former times.
He takes on the form of an old man or woman with pale skin color and appears in all parts of Japan. He walks into homes and brings epidemic illness and misfortune to its inhabitants.
Many villages hung a sacred rope (shimenawa) in front of the village entrance to keep him out.

疫病神 Yakubyo-gami

- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

During the Heian period, it was thought of as a demon, like the Demon of Illness 疫鬼 from China.

There were some rituals to appease him and keep him out of the town.
People also bought amulets to keep healthy.


To hang an image of Shoki 鍾馗, the Demon Queller, in a room was also thought to keep him out.


Shoki fighting against the demons
Kawanabe Kyosai 河鍋暁斎画

. Shooki 鍾馗 Shoki The Demon Queller .



Images of Ganzan Daishi 元三大師, priest Ryōgen 良源 were also presumed to keep off epidemic diseases.


source : en.wikipedia.org

. Ganzan Daishi 元三大師 . - (912 – 985)


Abe no Seimei was also fighting the Yakubyogami folks.
. Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 .
(February 21, 921 – October 31, 1005)

. Yōka 八日様 Yoka Sama, the Honorable Day Eight .
with rituals for Yakubyogami


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不動利益縁起絵巻 - Fudo Riyaku Engi Emaki
- 鎌倉期14Cより - 泣不動縁起絵, 証空絵詞
From temple 三井寺 Mitsuidera.



This piece is also known as Naki Fudō Engi-e (Story of Crying Fudō) or Shoukū Ekotoba (Illustrated Story of Shoukū).

There are parts missing before and after this emaki, but the story is roughly the following. Chikoo 智興 of Mitsui-ji 三井寺 temple became ill, and his disciple Shoukū 証空 decided to take on the illness in his place.
The first picture depicts a scene where Shoukū's mother is grieving upon hearing his decision.
In the second scene, Chikou and the demon of ill health are in his quarter of the temple, and following that, Abe no Seimei sets up an altar and prays for the substitution of the ill body. There are ghosts in front of the altar.
In the third scene, Shoukū, who took on the illness, prays to Fudou Myouou (a powerful deity) for help. Then Fudo Myo-o takes on the illness, thereby Shoukū's pain disappears. Fudou Myouou was tied up and sent to the realm of the dead. The ruler of the realm was astounded by that, and released Fudou Myouou immediately. He returns riding on a cloud. After this scene, only the words survived, which says that Shoukū, recovered from illness, meets his mother again, rejoicing.

The story seems to have been popular in the medieval period, as there were a number of versions produced in that period that have survived. Among them, this piece is a rare one for its time of production in the late Kamakura period, which is indicated by its features of the solid lines for the shapes of buildings, and the free and easy style of the landscapes and mists, which is not formalized yet.
This piece can be said to be one of the most valuable emaki in the history of Japanese art.

「泣不動縁起絵」、「証空絵詞」の名でも知られる。
絵巻の前後に欠失があるが、およその話は次の通り。三井寺の僧・智興が病にかかり、弟子の証空が師に代わってその病を受ける決意をする。
第一段の絵は証空がその決意を母に告げ、母が嘆き悲しむところ。
第二段は智興の坊に病の彼と病魔がおり、つづいて阿部清明が祭壇を設けて病身身代わりの祈祷を行うところ。祭壇の前にはもののけたちがいる。
第三段では病を受けた証空が、苦しみのなかで不動明王の画像に助けてくれることを祈ると、不動明王がその病を受け、証空の病は消える。不動明王は縛られて冥府に向かうが、冥王はそれを見てびっくり。不動明王は直ちに解放され、雲に乗って帰還する。このあとは第四段の詞のみが残り、病の癒えた証空が母と再会し喜ぶことが書かれている。
- source : www.emuseum.jp/detail


. Naki Fudo 泣き不動 / 泣不動 Weeping Fudo .


. Fudō Myō-ō, Fudoo Myoo-Oo 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O
Acala Vidyârâja - Vidyaraja - Fudo Myoo .



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. shimenawa 注連縄 a sacred rope .

. yakuyoke 厄除け amulets to ward off evil .
ekibyooyoke 疫病除 ekibyo-yoke, to ward off disease and illness

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ekijin 疫神 ekijin
. Ootokuji 王徳寺 Otoku-Ji . - Matsumoto, Nagano



gyooyakujin 行疫神 gyoyakujin
The god of epidemic diseases 行疫神(ぎょうやくじん) had to be appeased by scattering cherry blossoms in the wind.
. Mount Miwa (三輪山, Miwa-yama, Miwayama) .
Hanashizume matsuri 鎮花祭 "appease the blossoms"


. Kakinomoto Hitomaro 柿本人麻呂 Hitomaru 人丸 / 人麿 . .
seen as yakubyoo yoke no kami 疫病除け神 - Yakubyo Deity to ward off infectious diseases

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Yakubyogami - by Kurokawa Hiroyuki


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- quote
Monster Papercraft - Yakubyogami


Yakubyogami - a demon that causes illness, misfortune, and sorrow.
Until the late 19th century, Japanese people believed illness was spread by evil gods called yakubyogami. At first these gods were thought to take human form, but later, influenced by thinking in texts from China, some people came to think of them as little beasties small enough to enter the body.
- source : paperkraft.blogspot.jp


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- - - The three deities most feared in Japan:

. Shinigami 死神 God of Death "Grim Reaper" .

. Binbogami, Binboo Gami 貧乏神 Bimbogami, God of Poverty .

. Yakubyoogami 疫病神 Yakubyogami, Deity of Diseases .

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- Reference : 疫病神
- Reference : yakubyogami


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

疫病神貧乏神もお立ちかな
ekibyogami binbootami mo o-tachi kana

the god of disease
and the god of poverty
are both leaving . . .


Maruyama Ryuugen 丸山柳絃 Maruyama Ryugen


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08/05/2014

yabusame

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yabusame 流鏑馬 archery on horseback


- source and photos : Takada no Baba 高田馬場 - mizukawa

umayumi 騎射 (うまゆみ) "horses and bows"
..... 馬弓(うまゆみ)
..... yabusame 流鏑馬(やぶさめ)Yabusame
inuoumono 犬追物(いぬおうもの)
kasagake 笠懸(かさがけ)shooting blunt whistling arrows
kisha 騎射(きしゃ) shooting from horseback

Finally the great archery contest at the imperial palace takes place on the fifth day of the fifth month.

The horses have been selected in august of the previous year and again in April of this year for training.

- - - - - more kigo in connection with this imperial Yabusame

sa-ukon no baba no umayumi 左右近の馬場の騎射 (さうこんのばばのうまゆみ)
archery contest of the guards at the imperial archery stadium
hiori no hi ひおりの日(ひおりのひ)"archery contest day"
sakon no aratetsugai 左近の荒手番(さこんのあらてつがい)
ukon no aratetsukgai 右近の荒手番(うこんのあらてつがい)
sakon no matetsugai 左近の真手番(さこんのまてつがい)
ukon no matetsugai 右近の真手番(うこんのまてつがい)

The imperial guards were divided into the left (sakon) and the right (ukon). They had to do take lots (tetsugai) to find out in which order they were to perform at this contest.

observance kigo for mid-summer
. WKD : kigo about horses .

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- quote
Yabusame
A type of mounted archery in which the rider shoots at a target from a galloping horse. Arrows with a turnip-shaped head are used. There is a theory that the etymology of the word Yabusame is a contraction of yabaseume and it is thought to mean to shoot arrows on horsback.
Three targets are placed along a track which is about 218 meters (two chō) in length. The archer wears a costume comprising straw headgear (aya-i-gasa), cloak (suikan), a bracer or arm guard (igote), gloves, fur chaps (mukabaki), shooting shoes (monoigutsu); he carries a long sword (tachi) and short sword (koshigatana), a quiver of arrows (ebira) on his back, and has a bound wisteria bow (shigedō).

The number of archers is not fixed; it can number from a few to sixteen. The practice of mounted shooting is known from as early as the reign of Emperor Shōmu in the Nara period. Yabusame is listed in the Shin-Sarugakki by Fujiwara no Akihira (989?-1066) as one of the shooting arts, along with shooting from a running horse (haseyumi), ambush (machiyumi), deer hunting with blazing torch (tomoshiyumi), shooting on foot (kachiyumi), mounted archery (noriyumi) and shooting a distant target from horseback (kasagake).

It is also recorded in the Chūyūki that in 1096, on the 29th day of the fourth month, retired Emperor Shirakawa watched yabusame at the riding ground of the Toba Palace. This suggests that in the capital in the late Heian period, Yabusame was popular among the warriors (bushi) as one of the military arts. From the late Heian to early Kamakura periods, Yabusame became a ritual in shrines and temples: it was offered as a petition to the gods for fortune in battle.
In the early Kamakura period, it became a regular feature of the Kosatsuki festival at the Shin-Hie shrine, and in the Hōjō'e (a festival to free caged animals) of Tsuruoka Hachimangū. As it extended to various regional shrines and temples, yabusame as a religious ritual practice became the mainstream and after the Kamakura period it withered as a practice amongst the warriors.

By the Muromachi period it had died out, and while there were attempts to revive it, these failed due to a lack of knowledge of the ancient practices. According to the Teijō-zakki (1843), during the Kyōhō period (1716-36) the Shōgun Tokugawa Yoshimune planned a revival of Yabusame. He ordered all the military families and feudal lords (daimyō) to present their records concerning Yabusame traditions and teachings.

Urakami Yagozaemon collected these, compiled and published the book Yabusame Ruijū, thus establishing anew the rules and forms of Yabusame. The yabusame practiced today at the Ana Hachimangū at Takadanobaba in Shinjuku, is said to go back to 1728 when the Shōgun Yoshimune ordered it as a petition for the healing of his son Ieshige's smallpox. Yabusame is also an offering at festivals at the Tsuruoka Hachimangū and other regional shrines.
- source : Takayama Shigeru, Kokugakuin, 2007


Urakami Yagozaemon Naokata 浦上弥五左衛門直方

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straw headgear (aya-i-gasa) 綾藺笠



bracer or arm guard (igote) 射籠手 - 射篭手



shooting shoes (monoigutsu) 物射沓



fur chaps (mukabaki) 行縢 - 行騰




cloak (suikan) 水干

click on the images for more samples !
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- quote
Yabusame shinji 流鏑馬神事
This rite takes place on September 16 at Tsurugaoka Hachimangū in Kamakura City, Kanagawa Prefecture. In the afternoon, horseback archery (yabusame) take place at the horse riding area inside the shrine precinct (keidaibaba). Three archers dressed in the hunting clothes from the Kamakura period receive the Shinto priest's (shinshoku) blessing and drink sacred sake (miki). When signaled by the magistrate (bugyō) they start running their horses. There are three targets numbered one to three. They each shoot an arrow from their horses. After three archers are finished, more than ten other yabusame are performed.

On April 22 and 23, yabusame rites takes place at the branch (massha) Hachimangū of Watatsu Shrine, Hamochi Town, Sado County, Niigata Prefecture. Two young archers are selected from clan members (ujiko). They confine themselves for two nights and three days.
Early in the morning of the twenty-second, a bamboo purification place (imidake) is set up on the seashore and a purification ceremony for archers and horses takes place. In the afternoon, the sacred horse (shinme) flanked by two other horses, line up in front of the shrine gate (torii). Then the rite is performed and there is a ceremony (yūmato shiki) where two archers shoot an arrow in the evening sky.
On the morning of twenty-third, three horses line up in front of the torii and food and wine offerings to the kami (shinsen) are presented. Yabusame takes place at a temporary Hachimangū shrine and also in front of the torii.

The first archer starts running his horse from in front of Hachimangū, and throws peach leaves he is holding in front of the first target. The second archer throws peach leaves in front of the second target, reaches the torii, turns around, and returns to Hachimangū. Next, they change their clothes and three times shoot arrows at the target from the running horses. When the ceremony is finished, they head for Watatsu Shrine. In front of the torii, the last arrow is shot into the sky. At the shrine, arrows (ya), fans (oogi), and amulets (shinsatsu) are distributed. These items are believed to drive off the kami of disease.

Yabusame rites takes place on May 5 at Sengen Taisha of Fujisan Honmiya, Fujimi City, Shizuoka Prefecture. The day before this the shrine buildings are decorated with irises (shōbu) and mugwort (yomogi) and there is a ceremony. The distinctive feature of this ceremony is the presentation of steamed sticky-rice wrapped in leaves (chimaki), bamboo shoots (takenoko), sweet arrowroot (amakuzu), shōbu, and yomogi as food offerings to the kami (shinsen). Once this is completed, priests (shinshoku) and archers together go pay respect to other branch shrines (sessha and massha) such as Massha Wakamiya Hachimangū, Wakanomiya Sengen Shrine, Kanenomiya Shrine, and Fuchi Shrine.

At that time, targets are set up in the shrine precincts (keidai) in front of the shrine and each archer performs yabusame with a single arrow. Then, they return to the horse riding ground at the main shrine and participate in the kannagake ceremony of test shooting. On the afternoon of the fifth, five horseback archers bring offerings and face questioning (toigyōji) to confirm their backgrounds. In yabusame, there are "okonai" and "hon'nori."
Okonai perform various archery styles such as bow holding (dakiyumi) or kokiyumi in front of the mounted archers. Furthermore, the archer demonstrates the form to shoot heaven and a form to shoot the earth. He then stops his horse and demonstrates the form to shoot an arrow at the front and back, right and left, and at the target itself. At the third form, he shoots at the target. The hon'nori follows with each archer shooting an arrow from a running horse. This shinji is believed to have begun in 1193 by Minamoto no Yoritomo who was hunting at the base of Mt. Fuji.

Yabusame takes place on April 15 at the first shrine (ichinomiya) of Nukisaki Shrine in Tomioka City, Gunma Prefecture. There are two mounted archers. The curtains are set up around the horse riding ground in front of the gate of the shrine precincts (keidai). Two targets are erected and archers shoot from running horses.

At Mononobe Jinja in Ōta City, Shimane Prefecture, there is a Yabusame ceremony that takes place on October 9 as part of the seasonal festival (reisai). On the afternoon of the day before, the street in front of the shrine becomes a horse riding area and three targets are prepared. Sand is spread and horses have a test run. This is called "showing the horse riding ground" (babamise). The day of the event, in the afternoon, after the traditional ceremony (koden matsuri) and the shrine-maiden's dance (mikomai), the person in charge that year (nenban) and caretakers raise a flag (nobori) and parade on horseback wearing either warrior outifits or old ceremonial clothing (kamishimo). They parade from the shrine around the town and then return to the shrine. This is called the "renewal of donations" (kifumono aratame). Next three horses perform yabusame in the precincts of the shrine (keidai). In addition, there is a ceremony called shinme hikiwatashi where the sacred horse (shinme) is walked back and forth three times in the main garden in front of the shrine.
- source : Mori Sakae, 2007, Kokugakuin





- - - - - Yabusame videos on youtube
- source : www.google.co.jp


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Yōshū (Hashimoto) Chikanobu (1838-1912)


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- quote
Kasama Inari Jinja 笠間稲荷神社東京別社
The ceremonial yabusame observed at the Kasama Inari Jinja is dedicated both as a ritual of harvest divination - a subject with obvious and deep associations to the deity Inari Okami - and also as an element of Japanese culture. In order to preserve the ancient principles and techniques of the Ogasawara school - one of the two major styles of yabusame - a special equine training facility was built on the site of the old Kasama domain mounted archery grounds.

Shooters' Costumes
The yabusame rites held at the Kasama Inari Jinja are realized through the concerted participation and cooperation of large numbers of people. These include the shooters from the Ogasawara school of mounted archery, dressed in their meticulously recreated costumes, as well as members of the Kobudo Shinkokai (Society for the Promotion of old Martial Arts), parishioners of the Kasama Inari Jinja, and interested citizens, together with the mayor and police chief of the city of Kasama, who act as Grand Marshals (sobugyo) for the competition. Preceding the ritual, the participants gather before the shrine's Hall of Worship where they pray for a successful conclusion of the rites, after which they proceed in accordance with ancient precedent to the special equine archery grounds.



At the grounds, cedar targets are set up at three locations on the horse run ; the first is erected some thirty meters from the start, the second seventy-five meters from the first, and the third seventy-five meters from the second. Each target is erected at a height two meters from the ground. The rider spurs his horse from the start, and is required to shoot a whistling arrow at each of the three targets, all in a period of only about twenty seconds. The Grand Marshals judge the hits, which are used to divine the coming year's harvest.

MORE
- source : www.kasama.or.jp/english


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Yabusame Summit at Moroyama, Saitama
毛呂山でやぶさめサミット

Symposium シンポジウム - -  October 31 till November 3, 2010

Nine groups from all of Japan participated in this meeting, the first of its kind. They discussed the problems of finding followers of this difficult art form. It is also difficult to find suitable horses. The brocade costumes of the riders are also problematic to keep and pay for.
Yabusame is practised from Aomori to Kyushu in about 120 places, much less that the summit participants had envisaged (about 200, they hoped).
Many of the local yabusame events had been stopped after WW2, and only revived after 1990 again, but many have probles finding fundings nowadays.
Some shrines have no proper training place and the villagers have to train in nearby fields.

CLICK for more photos

The local yabusame at the shrine Izumo Iwai Jinja 出雲伊波比神社 has a history of 900 years.

Yabusame Video
source : Tim Ferriss

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- - - - - from the WKD library

Archery on Horseback, yabusame 流鏑馬  --- and more about Japanese Archery

Yabusame at Shrine Hachimangu Kamakura 鎌倉八幡宮

Yabusame sadame 流鏑馬定 at Shrine Kasuga Jingu

. Yabusame at Shrine Miyazaki Jinja .
In honor of the first emperor, Jinmu Tenno 神武天皇.

. Tsuwano Yabusame Festival流鏑馬まつり . 津和野、鷲原八幡宮




Amulet with Daruma, O-Tafuku and the hitting arrow.
Amulet to hit the target at Yabusame
from OkuniTama Shrine 大国魂神社
. Atariya 当たり矢 arrow to hit good luck .




source : katzegatto.blog58.fc2.com
amulet from 下鴨神社にて「流鏑馬神事」 Kyoto, Aoi Festival
to bring you good luck while hitting the target of your life !


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弓道人名一覧 - 弓道研究室 List of famous archers
- source : kyudoken.web.fc2.com/kyudo-jinmei


- Reference : 流鏑馬

- Reference : yabusame


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

流鏑馬に雨の上りし緑立つ
yabusame ni ame no agarishi midori tatsu

for yabusame
even the rain stops -
green starts to come out

Tr. Gabi Greve

Gotoo Hinao 後藤比奈夫 Goto Hinao


. WKD : 緑立つ green starts to stand up .
kigo for spring


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source : www.mapple.net/photos

流鏑馬の馬場が整ひ秋祭
yabusame no baba ga totonoi akimatsuri

for yabusame
the race ground is prepared -
autumn festival

Tr. Gabi Greve

Kurihara Minoru 栗原満

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06/05/2014

Isaniwa Matsuyama

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Isaniwa Jinja 伊佐爾波神社
愛媛県松山市桜谷町173番地 - Ehime, Matsuyama

also called Yuzuki Hachiman 湯月八幡 or Dogo Hachiman 道後八幡
at Dogo Onsen hot spring
Many famous samurai offered ema to this shrine.


. . . CLICK here for more Photos !


- quote
Behind Dogo Onsen, you’ll find a large torii gate with a road leading steeply up a hill. At the top of the road is an even steeper flight of rough stone steps, topped by a towering vermillion red structure. This is the gateway of Isaniwa Shrine, which sits above Dogo offering a fine view over Matsuyama.

... Isaniwa Shrine is devoted to the god Hachiman, patron of warriors, and decorating the shrine here and there are a number of paintings of warriors and warfare, dating from various periods. One panel from the Meiji period shows a number of steel battleships and little stick men with rifles engaged at the siege of Port Arthur.

The shrine is said to have been founded on the site where Emperor Chuai and Empress Jingu bathed at Dogo Onsen. Modeled on Iwashimizu Hachimangu in Kyoto Prefecture, the current buildings were constructed in the Hachiman-zukuri style in 1667. The shrine is visually stunning with its red paint, gold leaf, its roofs of cypress bark and tile, and its semi-tropical greenery.

In the fourteenth century the Kōno clan moved the shrine to its present location and it was rebuilt by the Matsudaira clan in the seventeenth century.
Isaniwa Jinja was restored in 1970.
- source : en.japantravel.com/view



source : isaniha.exblog.jp


- - - - - Three female deities in residence

Ichikishimahime no Mikoto, Ishikishima Hime no Mikoto 市杵島姫尊
Tagitsuhime no Mikoto, Tagitsu Hime no Mikoto 湍津姫尊 / 多岐津比売命
Tagirihime no Mikoto, Tagiri Hime no Mikoto 田心姫命 / 多岐理比売命 / Tagorihime

. The Three Godesses of Munakata 宗像神社 .


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amulet for good health - 病気平癒




amulet to improve studying - 学業成就御守


- - - - - Special festivals of the shrine - - - - -

厄除・星祭 Star Festival, warding off evil influence - February 3
常盤新田霊社例祭 Main Festival - February 12
例大祭 Grand Festival - October 6
- and all other seasonal festivals

- - - - - Homepage of the shrine
- source : isaniwa.ddo.jp


. Amulets and Talismans from Japan . 

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- Reference : 伊佐爾波神社

- Reference : Isaniwa shrine

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. Doogo Onsen 道後温泉 Dogo Onsen and Masaoka Shiki 正岡子規 .


. Hachiman Shrines and their festivals - 八幡宮 Hachimangu .

. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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伊狹庭 の湯はしもさはに梅咲けり
Isaniwa no yu wa shimosawa ni ume sakeri

the hot spring of Isaniwa
is gushing out plentifully
and plum blossoms in full bloom . . .


Kakurai Akio 加倉井秋を (1909 - 1988)

Memorial stone in Matsuyama
- source : ameblo.jp/honmokujack


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source : http://dogomura.seesaa.net

栗の花こぼれて居るや神輿部屋
kuri no hana koborete iru ya Isaniwaya

sweet chestnuts
in full bloom -
Isaniwa Shrine


. Kawahigashi Hekigotoo 河東碧梧桐 Hekigoto, Hekigodo .


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08/12/2013

Hine Jinja

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Hine Jinja 日根神社
大阪府泉佐野市日根野631 - Osaka, Izumisano City

Hine shrine is probably the only shrine for the pillow and bedroom.
If people coan not sleep, they come here to pray for good sleep.

anmin 安眠 to pray for beauty sleep


It also helps couples to get a child.



source : www.geolocation.ws/v/W/File

The tabisho 旅所, where the mikoshi palanquins of the festival are carried to.

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makura matsuri まくら祭り pillow festival
4th - 5th May, 2013






source : www.goldenjipangu.com



- quote
A rare festival of parading with about 25 pillows on a 5m long green bamboo carried on the shoulder. It originated when villagers offered rice bags tied on green bamboo sticks to soldiers going to battle.
- source : www.osaka-info.jp/en

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HP of the shrine
Amulets for
子授け・安産・安眠・お宮参り・七五三・厄除け・交通安全・新築・地鎮祭









anmin omamori 安眠お守り for good sleep


cover for the pillow, in red, pink, yellow or green

- source : hine-jinja/sairei.


- reference - Hine Shrine -

- reference - 日根神社 -

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. biyoo jisha 美容寺社 praying for beauty .


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .


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船酔ひの残りし枕祭笛
funayoi no nokorishi makura matsuribue

still suffering
from seasickness - the flute
of the pillow festival


Inagaki Kikuno 稲垣きくの (1906 - 1987)



CLICK for more photos !


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. ryoomu fuda 良夢札 amulet for a good dream .
Matsushima Jinja 松島神社, Tokyo


. WKD : makura  枕 (まくら) pillow .


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31/08/2013

sorei - ancestral spirits

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sorei 祖霊 ancestral spirits, ancestor spirits

- quote
The term is used frequently to refer to a soul that no longer possesses individual characteristics.
As Yanagita Kunio has shown, for a certain period of time (thirty-three years in many cases) after death a soul receives memorial services and is called a shiryō spirit of the dead). This is distinguished from a sorei, which has lost its individuality. Some posit that sorei may be further elevated to become deified spirits (shinrei, mitama).
A family or a community may worship deified ancestral spirits as their "ancestral deity" (sojin) or "tutelary deity" (ujigami).
source : Nishioka Kazuhiko,Kokugakuin

shiryoo 死霊 spirit of the dead

. ujigami 氏神 tutelary deity, guardian/patron deity, clan deity .




source : panoramio.com
Ikohayawake no mikoto jinja - sorei sha 伊去波夜和氣命神社祖霊社
Izanagi and Izanami

soreisha 祖霊社 "shrine for the ancestor sprits"
. mitamaya 御霊屋 mausoleum .





soreisha 祖霊舎 household Shinto altar, kamidana 神棚 .

. kamidana 神棚 household Shinto altar, "shelf for the Gods" .

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sojin, soshin, oyagami 祖神 spirits of ancestral deities

- quote
Progenitor kami of a clan. Here a kami is not viewed as a transcendental being but rather is a concept within the genealogical relations of living people. A synonym of sojin is oyagami (parental deity), where oya does not necessarily refer to a progenitor but rather has a more general, comprehensive connotation. It is based on the belief that all human beings are descendents of kami. The term sojin does not always imply an ancestral deity of a certain bloodline or particular locality. Amaterasu, the ancestral goddess of the tennō (emperor), is a good example.

The progenitor kami of the tennō's line is alternatively termed kōso (imperial ancestor), tenso (heavenly ancestor), or taiso (great ancestor). Compendium of Aristocratic Kindreds (Shinsenshōjiroku), which was compiled in the Heian period, categorizes families in the Kinai region according to their ancestors. Those whose ancestors were tennō were designated kōbestu; those whose ancestors were kami were designated shinbetsu; and those whose ancestors were foreign immigrants were designated shoban.
The category of those with kami ancestors is further divided into three types:
those whose kami ancestors were heavenly kami were tenjin;
those whose ancestors were descendents of kami were tenson; and
those whose ancestors were earthly kami were chigi.

The progenitor deity for some important historical clans are noted below:

Abe no ason — Ōhiko no mikoto (Left capital, tennō descent)
Kibi no ason — Wakatakehiko no mikoto (Right capital, tennō descent)
Fujiwara no ason — Ame no koyane no mikoto (Left capital, kami descent, tenjin)
Isonokami no ason — Kannigihayahi no mikoto (Left capital, kami descent, tenjin)
Ōtomo no sukune — Ame no oshihi no mikoto (Left capital, kami descent, tenjin)
Owari no muraji — Hoakari no mikoto (Left capital, kami descent, tenson)
Inbe no sukune — Ame no futotama no mikoto (Right capital, kami descent, tenjin)
Kamo no agatanushi — Taketsu no mi no mikoto (Yamashiro, kami descent, tenjin)
Ōmiwa no ason — Ōkuninushi no mikoto (Yamato, kami descent, chigi)
Kuzu — Ishiho oshiwake no kami (Yamato, kami descent, chigi)
Tsushima no ason — Ame no koyane no mikoto (Settsu, kami descent, tenjin)
Tsumori no sukune — Ame no ho akari no mikoto (Settsu, kami descent, tenson)
Uzumasa-kō no sukune — Shikōtei (Left capital, immigrant descent, Han)
Miyake no muraji — Ame no hihoko no mikoto (Right capital, immigrant descent, Silla)

The phrases such as "sumera ga mutsu kamurogi" (cherished ancestral deity of the tennō) in the Great Purification liturgy (oharae kotoba) archived in Engishiki, or "waka mutsu kamurogi" (our cherished ancestral kami) referred to in the Kōtoku chapter in Nihongi both suggest a familiar and beloved parental kami. This traditional view has a strong connection to the idea of a parental deity in modern new religions.
source : Nishioka Kazuhiko, Kokugakuin






kooso, kōso 高祖 imperial ancestor
tenso 天祖 heavenly ancestor
taiso 大祖 great ancestor


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oyagami, sojin 祖神 "parent deity"

- quote
"Parent deity," an extension of the image of parenthood to kami, expressing the belief that kami care for human beings in the same way that human parents care for their children. The term is believed to describe the close relationship between kami and humans, one embodying a particularly intimate affection toward the kami.

The concept of "parent kami" can be found in at least two forms:
(1) a somewhat abstract concept of oyagami which has existed since ancient times and
(2) a more or less doctrinally codified concept which developed as a part of sectarian Shintō and Shinto-related new religions.
This article will discuss the latter concept.

Certain of the Shinto sects understand the entirety of nature, the world, or the cosmos to be a living entity, a life-current or interlinked vitality which overflows with productive power, one which is undying and without end. In turn, the original source or root of that interlinked vitality is sometimes expressed as oyagami, a term used to describe the original or ultimate existence which endlessly gives birth to all things.
From this point of view, it is thought that human beings are "apportioned spirits of the kami" (kami no bunrei), or "offspring of the kami (kami no ujiko) whose lives have been bestowed or loaned to them by the kami.

Based on this concept, a doctrine developed which suggested that human beings, as "children of kami," are originally of the same substance as kami, and thus harbor the potential to reach the state of kami within themselves. For example, within the new religion of Tenrikyō, the main deity is called "Oyagami," and the sect founder Nakayama Miki is known as "Oyasama"; this kind of common use of the word "parent" (oya) affixed before the kami serving as the subject of worship is thought to be a reflection of the Japanese people's traditional apprehension of the meaning of kami.
source : Fukushima Shinkichi, Kokugakuin



. doosojin 道祖神 deities by the wayside .


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senzo matsuri 先祖まつり festival of the ancestors

On the island Mikurajima 御蔵島 there is no temple any more, only a soreisha shrine 祖霊社 to celebrate during O-Bon, O-Higan and other festivals.
So now they celebrate this festival twice a year during the equinox. During the rituals, girls of the age of 15 are allowed to wear a long-sleeve kimono for the first time, to present them to the ancestors as "little women".
After a ceremony at the shrine, people eat mochi ricecakes and sweets in white and red auspicious colors.
source : satoyumi



. Ancestor Worship and the O-Bon お盆 festival .



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source : yukikot23.exblog.jp


一面に祖霊一面の曼珠沙華
ichimen ni sorei ichimen no manjushage

everywhere there are
ancestor sprits - everywhere there are
spider lilies


Morio Suzume 森尾雀子

. WKD : Spider Lilies (higanbana, manjushage) .





残菊を折れば祖霊の声すなり
zangiku o oreba sojin no koe sunari

breaking a late chrysanthemum
I hear the voice
of the ancestor spirits . . .


Hata Yumi 秦夕美

. WKD : zangiku 残菊 remaining chrysanthemum .


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