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06/01/2020

kaze catching cold kami legends

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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
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kaze no kami 風邪の神 Deity of the common cold
kaze no kamisama かぜの神様
Sekigamisama 咳神様 Deity of coughing



source : yokai.com/kazenokami - Matthew Meyer
Kami of the Wind,
but since January 2020, also bringing the Coronavirus Kaze Influenze thread all over the world.


. kaze 風邪 (かぜ) common cold .
and its season words

. hayariyamai はやり病 / 流行病と伝説 Legends about epidemics .

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The word kaze 風邪 can also be read fuuja ふうじゃ.
In this case the deity is called go-fuuja sama ごふうじゃ様 Go-Fuja Sama.
If he comes to a person, this person will catch a cold.



The human body has a special acupuncture point called
fuumon 風門 "gate for the cold wind"
and this is where the Deity of the common cold comes into a body.
Keeping this part of the body warm will prevent the Deity to come in.

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Kaze no Kami okuri 風邪の神送り Seeing off the deity of catching a cold
Rakugo story, told by 3代目桂米朝、8代目林家正蔵など。

In the Edo period many people lost their lives catching a cold.
If there was a bad cold epidemy in town, people performed a ritual to send the Deity off. They made a small paper figure of the deity and carried if off to the border of their village or town with music of drums and gongs. The paper figure could also be floated away in a river or at the beach.
Once a group went to do that and chanted
"Let's see him off, fast, let's see him off, the Deity of catching cold!"
But there was one person in the village who regretted this act.
It was the local kusuriya 薬屋 drugstore (or the local doctor).
Once the villagers came together to sent the Deity off with great effort, floating it down the river, but 夜 that night it got caught in the ami 網 net of a fisherman and thus came back.
What had happened?
It got caught at night (yo 夜) in a net (ami 網) - a pun with yowami 弱み weakness.

. rakugo 落語 comic storytelling .

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. kaze 風邪と伝説 Legends about catching a cold .
The character for kaze 風 means wind.



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. kooshin 庚申伝説 Legends about the Koshin Cult .
The Koshin Deity 庚申さん Koshin San is also seen as Kaze no Kami 風邪の神 the Deity of catching cold.
for example in Shiga 滋賀県


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. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

なやらひをすませて憑かる風邪の神
角川源義 Kadogawa Genyoshi (1917 - 1975)

なにもせざれば風邪の神にも会はざりき
星野麥丘人 Hoshino Bokugyujin (1925 - 2013)


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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

....................................................................... Ehime 愛媛県 .....
.......................................................................
今治市 Imabara 玉川町 Tamagawa

. kotatsu heater and day of the Inoko 亥の子 wild boar .

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Ehime 伊予郡 Io district 砥部町 Tobe town

. Sai no Kami 幸神 / 幸の神 / さいの神 Deity of Fortune and Good Luck .
When Sai no Kami was sleeping by the roadside, one of his legs was cut off by a car and he had to live with one leg only.
Therefore as an offering for the New Year and 盆 O-Bon for the ancestors people make only one zoori 草履 straw sandal.
Sai no Kami is also seen as 風邪の神 Kaze no Kami.




....................................................................... Kyoto 京都府 .....
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天田郡 Amata district 三和町 Miwa town

風邪の神 Kaze no Kami is also seen as 庚申さん Koshin san.
When a child is healed from hashika はしか the measles, people pack some nigiri おにぎり rice ball offerings in straw and bring them to his shrine.




....................................................................... Miyazaki 宮崎県 .....
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東臼杵郡 Higashi-Usuki district 西郷村 Nishigo village

. neko 猫 / ねこ と伝説 Legends about cats, Katzen .
Once an old hag living with her family killed the cat by throwing it under the usu 臼 mortar.
But the family became cursed and to make up for it venerated the cat in a small shrine in the garden as
猫神様 Kami of cats
風邪の神様 Kami against the cold
乳が出る神様 Kami to make mothers milk flow.



....................................................................... Osaka 大阪府 .....
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岸和田市 Kishiwada city

Once there lived a poor man in a run-down house.
One day in winter he caught a cold. He roasted some surume スルメ squid and drunk some sake 酒 rice wine, when suddenly an old man came out of the closet and left the house.
Well, the old man was 風邪の神 Kaze no Kami, who can not stand the smell of roasted squid. The man wa healed in no time.




....................................................................... Yamanashi 山梨県 .....

During a cold epidemic, people press the hand of a small child on a red piece of paper and write
「吉三さんはおりません」 Kichizo san is not here. Thjs is hung at the entrance, to prevent the Deity of the common cold from coming into the home.
They say when Yaoya no O-Shichi 八百屋お七 Greengrocer's Daughter Oshichi was in love with Kichizo and died from her love, she became Kaze no Kami 風邪の神 Deity of the common cold.
She walks around the village looking for Kichizo, but if there is a red piece of paper she realizes that this is not her Kichizo and goes away.

. Yaoya no O-Shichi 八百屋お七 Greengrocer's Daughter Oshichi .


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- reference : nichibun yokai database -

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- #kazenokami #sekigami #fujasama #fumon -
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10/08/2019

Kikuna Shrine Gaman Yokohama

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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
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Kikuna Jinja 菊名神社 Kikuna Shrine, Kanagawa


神奈川県横浜市港北区菊名6-5-14 / 6 Chome-5-14 Kikuna, Kohoku Ward, Yokohama, Kanagawa

There were originally five shrines in an area of Sugiyama Jinja 杉山神社 Sugiyama Shrine, which is now in 菊名町公園 Kikuna Town Park.
The new Kikuna Shrine is famous for its 24 paintings of chrysanthemums on the ceiling.
kiku 菊 means Chrysanthemum.

ここ菊名の地には、昭和の初期まで神明社(天照皇大神)、杉山神社(日本武尊)、浅間神社(木花咲耶姫命)、八幡神社(譽田別命)、阿府神社(武内宿禰命)の5社が村社として地域の人々の信仰を集めて参りました。中でも記録に残るものとして最も古くからあるのが、阿府(あぶ)神社であり、その歴史は任和元年(885年)に遡るといわれております。時の天皇、光孝天皇が師岡に勅使を遣わされ熊野神社を創建なされた時、勅使がその途上、馬具の鎧をお納めになったことからその名が付いたと史書には書かれております。
この5社が昭和10年、現在は菊名町公園となっている杉山神社の地に合祀され、名も「菊名神社」と改められました。その後、太平洋戦争の戦火を逃れてからは、同所を保健所建設用地として提供するため、当時の八幡神社の地(現菊名神社の地)に社殿を移設、以降この地で菊名の総鎮守として地域の人々とともに歩み、またその生活を見守り続けて参りました。
この間、氏子崇敬者の厚いご協力の下、昭和32年には社殿の改修および社務所・神楽殿が建設され、信仰の対象としてだけでなく、地域住民の交流と青少年の研修の場としても大きな役割を担うこととなりました。そしてこの度平成23年には、50年ぶりの大々的な社殿改修工事を終え、21世紀に相応しい姿となって生まれ変わりました。
新たに完成した拝殿の天井には、中心に「菊」の花を配し、四方にはがまんさまによって守られる24枚の天井画が飾られております。テーマは「菊名の絆」です。これは社殿は新しくなっても、菊名の総鎮守として以前と同様、変わらずこの地の人々とともにあることを示しているのです。拝殿には、24枚の天井画、輪になって咲く菊の花が中心に描かれ、四方は開運招福を呼ぶ四季を背景にしたがまんさまで守られています。
- source : kikunajinja.jp/profile/goyurai...

- - - - - Deities in residence - - - - -
・ 誉田別命(ほんだわけのみこと)Hondawake no Mikoto
・ 天照皇大神(あまてらすすめおおみかみ)Omaterasu Omikami
・ 日本武尊(やまとたけるのみこと)Yamato Takeru no Mikoto
・ 木花咲耶姫命(このはなさくやひめのみこと)Konohana Sakuyahime no Mikoto
・ 武内宿禰命(たけのうちすくねのみこと)Takenouchi Sukune no Mikoto


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gaman sama がまんさま "endure the hardships"

This is a stone statue of an Oni demon, supporting the handwash basin.
Actually, there are also two of them.



They were made around 1800.
It expresses the endurance of the stone figures supporting the handwash basin for so many years without any complaint.

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shuin 朱印 stamp




omamori お守り amulets

- CLICK on the photo to see more amulets !


- - - - - HP of the Shrine
- source : kikunajinja.jp... -


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- Reference : 菊名神社
- Reference : kikuna shrine yokohama


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .


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- #gamansama #kikuna #kikunashrine -
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20/07/2019

Kawanokami legends

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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
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kawa no kami 川の神と伝説 Legends about the "River Deity"

Kappa 河童 is a“Kawa no Kami” 川の神 / 河の神 (lit. River Deity)
. Kawa no Kami, 水神 Suijin and Kappa .
- Introduction -
Kappa カッパ is often seen as Kawanokami or Mizunokami.

. Mizu no Kami, Mizunokami 水の神 Deity of Water .


- quote -
Kappa
mentioned in the Nihon Shoki 日本書紀 (Chronicles of Japan), one of Japan's earliest official records, compiled around 720 AD.
Other names: Kahaku (Nihongi)
A generic name for kami of rivers and streams.
The lineage of this kami is not described in the classics. Nihongi's record of Emperor Nintoku's reign contains an anecdote regarding the offering of human sacrifices (hitobashira) to the river deity called "Lord of the River" (Jp. kahaku; Ch. Hebo) at the occasion of constructing a riverbank, and Nihongi's record of Empress Kōgyoku likewise notes that during a great drought, prayers were offered without effect to the "Lord of the River." The Man'yōshū includes poems indicating that the river kami serves the emperor, and numerous records from the Nara period reflect the offering of prayers to the kami of famous mountains and great rivers.
- reference source : Kokugakuin - Nakayama Kaoru -





CLICK for more photos !

kahaku, kawa no kami 河伯 River Deity, "river chief"
Kahaku Shushin 河伯主神




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- - - - - ABC List of the prefectures :


. ryuujin 竜神 /龍神 と伝説 Ryujin, Legends about the Dragon Deity .
Kawanokami is often seen as the same as the Ryujin Dragon Deity.
When he is offshore in the sea his wave pattern can sometimes be seen. In that case the fishermen sit down and pray to the deity.




......................................................................................... Akita 秋田県
.......................................................................
山本郡 Yamamoto district 二ツ井町 Futatsui town

Once upon a time, there was a year with not enough rain and water, people say the Kappa has come out and eaten all the cucumbers.
Since then farmers take the first two cucumbers of the harvest and throw it into the river shouting:
"川の神 Kawanokami, this is our offering!"




......................................................................................... Chiba 千葉県
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夷隅郡 Isumi district 夷隅町 Isumi town

Kappa is seen as Mizunokami, Kawanokami and an incarnation of a dragon deity.
If children are drowning in a river, this is the malicious deed of Kappa.




......................................................................................... Hyogo 兵庫県
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豊岡市 Toyooka city 竹野町 Takeno town

kawasoso, kawa soso 川ソソ Kamakami is called Kawasoso
He usually suppresses the Kappa 川コ Kawako, but lets him go on the last day of the sixth lunar month.
If someone goes into the river on this day, Kawako will take out his inner organs through the anus. He uses some iron tools to do that.




......................................................................................... Iwate 岩手県

Before peeing into a river, people ask Kawanokami to forgive them, to avoid his wrath.




......................................................................................... Kagoshima 鹿児島県


. Yama no Kami 山の神 God of the Mountain .
and Kawanokami, Kappa legends




......................................................................................... Kumamoto 熊本県
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熊本市 Kumamoto city

Kawanokami no tatari 川の神の祟 the curse of Kawanokami
Once there lived a man in the city called 平川円蔵 Hirakawa Enzo.
One he went to the local shrine and went to cut down the shinboku 神木 sacred tree, saying it was superstition not to cut such a tree.
Soon his wife became bewitched by the Kawanokami from the river 球磨川 Kumagawa and many strange things happened.

. shinboku 神木, shinju 神樹 sacred tree, divine tree .




......................................................................................... Nagasaki 長崎県
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On the 29th day of the 11th lunar month, Kawanokami comes walking along the road.
There is a strange noise like hyuuhyuu heard along the side of the pond.
It looks like a chidori 千鳥 plover with a long, red beek.
Sometimes it more looks like a man with a high hat, followed by many others. If people try to peek at the procession to see it clearly, it becomes invisible.


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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -


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- Reference : 川の神

. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

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- - - - -  H A I K U  - - - - -

焼米を炒るや川の神見そなはす



長谷川零餘子 Hasegawa Reiyoshi (1886 - 1928)


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[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]
- #kawanokami #rivergod #riverdeity #flussgott #mizunokami #kappa #yamanokami -
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16/07/2019

Kadota Inari Shrine

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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
- noroi 呪い to curse a person - see below
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Kadota Inari Jinja 門田稲荷神社 Kadota Inari Shrine


栃木県足利市八幡町387-7 / 387 Yawatacho, Ashikaga, Tochigi

下野國一社八幡宮 The first Hachiman shrine in Shimotsuke no kuni.
Founded in 1056, when 源義家 Minamoto no Yoshiie went up to the North to defeat the local people.
In the Western compound of the Hachiman shrine is Kadota Inari, one of the three most important shrines to "cut a bond".
Not only bonds between men and women, but also between a person and illness, too much drinking, gambling addiction and others.

Its best known aspect is the

enkiri ema 縁切絵馬 votive tablets to make a wish to cut a bond"

. enkiri, engiri 縁切り to cut a bond .

. Minamoto no Yoshiie Hachimantaro 源八幡太郎義家 / 源義家 .

- Deity in residence
倉稲魂神(うかのみたまのみこと) Ukanomitama no Mikoto

- reference -

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. wara ningyoo 藁人形 straw dolls for curses .

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- quote
- - - Death notes: Traditional rituals associated with curses persist in 21st-century Japan
It is a scorching summer afternoon with temperatures crawling toward 37 degrees Celsius. Kadota Inari Shrine is empty except for a chorus of screeching cicadas and the smooth stone statues of foxes guarding its entrance.
Hanging on either side of the shrine are hundreds of small wooden plaques known as ema (picture horses) baking beneath the sun.
A ritual tracing its roots to the Nara Period (710-794) when those who couldn’t afford to donate horses to the gods for good favor began substituting them with cheaper materials, the fastening of these votive tablets inscribed with worshippers’ hopes and prayers can now be found in shrines and temples across the nation.
But at Kadota Inari Shrine, located in the suburbs of Ashikaga, a city in Tochigi Prefecture some 90 minutes by train from Tokyo, visitors won’t find plaques with light-hearted wishes asking for good luck and rosy relationships.
“I’m completely exhausted dealing with K.S., the selfish devil in disguise who looks down on me, shouts at me and complains about each and everything I do. I hate you … I hate you … I hate you from the bottom of my heart, and I pray that you disappear from this world as soon as possible,” one of the plaques reads.
“I pray that my relationship with Hitomi, who betrayed me and wasted a year of my life, is completely severed” reads another. “She must be distanced from all paths leading to happiness. I will never let you become happy. May you suffer for the rest of your life to atone for my tears and agony. Mariko.”
Some wishes are more direct: “I pray that Okabe dies in an accident.”
Others are desperate pleas for help: “I pray that my family’s ties with depression and bipolar disorder come to an end.”
These are fervent, even violent expressions of raw, personal emotions rarely shown in public, and physical evidence of how traditional rituals associated with cursing are well and alive in 21st-century Japan.
--- Ominous origins
Kadota Inari Shrine is considered one of Japan’s three major enkiri, or “tie-cutting” shrines, in addition to Kyoto’s Fushimi Inari Taisha and Enkiri Enoki in Tokyo’s Itabashi Ward. However, occult writer Yuki Yoshida says Kadota Inari Shrine stands out in terms of the sheer number of plaques being offered and the level of animosity on display.
“A normal person may become sick of reading so many negative messages left on the plaques, but it’s an opportunity to observe the dark side of the human mind,” Yoshida says. “In fact, a number of dedicated fans visit Kadota Inari Shrine routinely to check the plaques hanging there. While Japan is often considered a secular society, it’s worth learning how there are still many people who seriously indulge in the act of cursing others.”
That said, Yoshida says regardless of how cruel wishes may be, revealing one’s darkest secrets in such fashion and letting off some steam is a healthier alternative to taking physical action.
“It’s an entirely different matter compared to unleashing one’s vented stress in the form of violence,” he says.
That’s what happened on Dec. 7, 2017, when the term “tatari,” or curse, appeared in stories describing a murder-suicide that took place at Tomioka Hachimangu, a well-known shrine in Tokyo’s Koto Ward.
Fifty-eight-year-old Nagako Tomioka, head priestess of the nearly 400-year-old shrine, was ambushed as she got out of a car on the grounds of the shrine and slashed to death by her samurai sword-wielding younger brother, Shigenaga Tomioka, who then stabbed and killed his wife, Mariko, and himself.
Shigenaga became head priest of Tomioka Hachimangu in 1995 but lost his job over money-related troubles.
He held a long-standing grudge against his sister who had taken over his role, and earlier on the day of the incident, asked an acquaintance to drop around 2,800 letters into a post box addressed to parishioners’ businesses and other shrines across the nation.
Reports said the eight-page letter demanded that his sister be banished from the shrine and his son be anointed head priest instead.
“If these demands aren’t met, I shall remain in this world after my death as an onryō (malevolent spirit) and forever exact vengeance against responsible board members and their descendants,” the letter read.
The bizarre case drew widespread attention due to the prominence of the shrine and ominous choice of vocabulary Shigenaga used in his parting message. It also showed how tenaciously the superstition in curses lingered in the modern age.
Earlier the same year, on Jan. 25, a 51-year-old man was arrested in Gunma Prefecture for intimidation. The man had left a straw effigy with a nail thrust through it in the parking lot of an amusement arcade. With red paint, the name of the female owner of the arcade was written on the chest of the doll, along with what appeared to be eyes and a mouth.
The man, a regular at the arcade, had apparently developed unrequited feelings toward the owner that led him to conduct a bare-bones version of one of the most dreaded curse rituals in Japan: ushi no koku mairi, or ushi no toki mairi, which literally means “shrine visit at the hour of the ox.”
According to a book published more than a century ago by U.S. orientalist and lecturer William Elliot Griffis titled “The Religions of Japan From the Dawn of History to the Era of Meiji,” women betrayed by their lovers typically performed this religious act of vengeance at the hour of the ox, which is between 1 and 3 a.m.
“First making an image or manikin of straw, she set out on her errand of revenge, with nails held in her mouth and with hammer in one hand and straw figure in the other, sometimes also having on her head a reversed tripod in which were stuck three lighted candles,” he wrote. “Arriving at the shrine she selected a tree dedicated to a god, and then nailed the straw simulacrum of her betrayer to the trunk, invoking the kami (god) to curse and annihilate the destroyer of her peace.”
Griffis wrote that he had seen rusted nails and pieces of straw struck on trees on multiple occasions.
- - - Straw effigies
Rituals involving straw effigies, or wara ningyō, remain a potent image in popular culture, and its roots can be traced back to the earliest era of recorded history in Japan.
At the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties is an eighth-century doll made of wood with an iron nail shoved through its chest. From the Tatecho archaeological site in Matsue, Shimane Prefecture, a wooden tag was discovered that had a drawing of a woman and holes left from wooden nails driven through her right breast and chest.
During the Heian Period (794-1185), straw effigies were crafted during plagues to dispel the sickness, while official shamans known as onmyōji practiced onmyōdō, a form of Japanese cosmology and divination based on the Chinese philosophies of Wu Xing and yin and yang that also utilized paper mannequins as shikigami — beings conjured to exercise tasks ordered by their masters.
While onmyōdō is no longer practiced, Kazuhiko Komatsu, a renowned ethnologist, discovered through his fieldwork in Kochi Prefecture that a faction of onmyodo survived as Izanagi-ryu (the Izanagi school) in the mountainous village of Monobe, where priests still perform exorcisms and cursing rituals.


The practice of ushi no koku mairi goes back to the legend of Hashihime,
a character that first appeared in Heian literature that depicted her as a lonely woman waiting for her lover to return, with later accounts transforming her into a jealous demon.
Her story was later adapted into “Kanawa” (“The Iron Crown”), the noh play by Zeami Motokiyo about a beautiful woman visiting Kifune Shrine in Kyoto at the hour of the ox every night to pray for vengeance against her ex-husband who left her for a different woman.
The play depicts her changing into a rage-filled demon who wears an iron tripod as a crown that holds three burning candles.
Her ex, who fears for his life, seeks the help of master onmyōji Abe no Seimei, who prepares two life-sized straw effigies to diffuse the demon’s wrath.
The symbolic relevance of the wara ningyō as a powerful cursing tool remains intact, and Kifune Shrine is still considered the mecca for the ushi no koku mairi ritual, although it is unclear how many still actively partake in the practice.
Kohei Kikuchi, an expert on dolls and an adjunct lecturer at Waseda University, uses these effigies in a different manner, introducing them as a prop in one of his classes.
He sources wara ningyō online, where they can be bought for as cheap as a few hundred yen from e-commerce platforms such as Amazon, Yahoo Auctions and Mercari.
Upon purchasing one, Kikuchi brings it into his classroom and introduces it to students as a “special guest,” drawing nervous laughter. He then nonchalantly throws it to the floor or toward his students from the podium, often generating a few screams.
“I start my lecture by asking my students why they react the way they do,” he says. “The object will have no relevance for a small child. But while growing up, we are exposed to the symbolism of the wara ningyō through various movies, books and television shows that imprint us with the notion that it is something dreadful.”
Kikuchi says he concludes his lecture by comparing the wara ningyō to an information medium akin to newspapers.
“A wara ningyō tells us someone is trying to curse another person,” he says. However, unlike newspapers, the amount of information these straw effigies can provide is limited, he says.
“We don’t know who cursed who and with what intent,” he says. “Perhaps the wara ningyō is being used to curse someone we know, or maybe even ourselves. That ambiguity and lack of information scares us.”
- - - Curse packages
For those looking to curse someone but remain wary of going through complicated rituals, there are online services that conduct curses on the client’s behalf.
Nihon Jujutsu Kenkyu Jukikai is one such service. Founded around three decades ago, the organization now staff around 30 people who undertake ushi no koku mairi and other rituals ranging in price from ¥20,000 to ¥300,000 depending on the skill set of the practitioner and the level of curse being administered, according to a spokesperson for the group.
Suzuki, who declined to reveal his first name citing privacy concerns, says prospective clients can consult Jukikai via instant messaging service Line, email and phone. Around 20 to 30 inquiries are received on an average day, he says, of which around 10 to 20 percent lead to actual contracts, the most popular being the ¥50,000 and ¥100,000 packages.
Clients are asked to provide information such as name, telephone number, address, gender, date of birth and blood type, as well as a brief description of the person they want to target, including their name, age, relationship with the client and gender.
Clients will then pay their dues upon receiving a parcel including a brochure explaining the schedule and procedures regarding the cursing ritual as well as a FAQ. “That’s all they have to do,” Suzuki says.
The ritual itself is conducted in a facility the organization owns in Nara Prefecture, and curious clients can call Jukikai any time to check up on the progress, Suzuki says.
“Contrary to what people may think, around 70 percent of the consultations we receive are romantic, while the rest involve grudges such as trouble with neighbors,” he says.
Meanwhile, a group of monks calling themselves JKS47, or Japan Kitou Society in English, have been gathering routinely in front of the Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry to protest the government for the restarting of nuclear reactors following meltdowns at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in 2011.
Formed in 2015, JKS47 — the name perhaps being a reference to the 47 ronin and popular pop-idol group AKB48 — considers itself the successor to a group of monks from the 1970s that cursed leaders of corporations responsible for environmental pollution through esoteric Buddhist rituals.
On a recent Thursday afternoon, a dozen or so members donning black robes and white sashes with the words “the dead shall judge” printed on them gathered by the Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry, musical instruments in hand, to recite sutras, perform music and deliver speeches.
While Buddhism and curses may not sound complimentary, “rituals for the subjugation of one’s enemies is an official category within the fourfold, or sometimes fivefold, ritual system within the esoteric Buddhist tradition,” says Eric Swanson, an assistant professor in the Theological Studies Department at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
Take Heian warlord Taira no Masakado, who led a rebellion against the central government in Heian-kyo (today’s Kyoto). According to Swanson, some accounts say the Shingon monk Kancho was dispatched to deal with the unrest and established a goma (fire ritual) hall on Narita mountain where he performed a subjugation ritual.
Masakado was subsequently killed in battle and his head was sent to the ancient capital to be displayed to the public. Legend has it, however, that its eyes glared and teeth ground in anger for several months, until one day the head flew to the east.
Masakado’s kubizuka (the mound where his head is said to rest) remains tucked away in a small plot of land surrounded by skyscrapers in Tokyo’s Otemachi business district. There have been attempts to remove it in the past, but these projects all failed due to accidents and illnesses some have attributed to his angry spirit. To this day, the tiny site is visited by suit-clad office workers offering prayers seeking his divine protection.
Whether or not these rituals are effective lies in the eye of the beholder. But for some, a trip to a shrine to inscribe one’s wishes on a votive tablet may be worth the while.
“Thank you for severing the bad relationships I had at work, I think I can now start afresh,” reads one plaque hanging at Kadota Inari Shrine. “I pray that I can lead a happy life full of good relationships.”
- source : Japan Times


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- Reference : 門田稲荷神社
- Reference : kadota inari shrine


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .


. Hashi Hime, Hashihime 橋姫 / はし姫 "Princess of the Bridge" .


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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

....................................................................... Fukushima 福島県 .....
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いわき市 Iwaki city 四倉町 Yotsukura machi town

chinju no sugi ni utareta kugi 鎮守の杉に打たれた釘
40年程前、ぢさまが長わずらいをしたとき、鎮守の杉の木に呪いの釘が打ち付けてあった。それを抜き取ったら、病気は自然と治った。



....................................................................... Kyoto 京都 .....
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noroi no sugi 呪いの杉 pine to curse a person
. Shrine Jishu Jinja 地主神社 .
in the back of Kiyomizu Temple





....................................................................... Shiga 滋賀県 .....
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伊香郡 Ika district 西浅井町

mashin no majinai 麻疹の呪い
子供が麻疹から治りかけの頃に、サンダワラを頭にのせて「熱いお湯ではないけれど、煮え湯」というと、熱がとれる。

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- reference : nichibun yokai database -
97 呪い noroi to collect

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04/02/2019

Keihin Fushimi Inari Kawasaki

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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
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京浜伏見稲荷神社 Keihin Fushimi Inari Shrine, Kanagawa


神奈川県川崎市中原区新丸子東2-980 / 2-980 Shinmarukohigashi, Nakahara Ward, Kawasaki, Kanagawa

The Shrine was founded in 1951 to become a place of worship for the many new residents in the nearby Tower Mansion (Tawaman) district.
It should give the residents a place to come and talk and make friends.
In 1954 the great iron Torii was erected, about 14 m high



In the compound are 108 statues of foxes, carved by a master in more than 20 years.
108 is the number of earthly desires in Buddhist lore.
The foxes take all kinds of poses and seem to enjoy themselves a lot.
And among them there is just one green animal . . . a frog.



- CLICK for more fox images !

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There is a row of rather small Torii gates for children to walk through.




A pond imitating Lake Biwako brings some coolness in summer.
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This shrine is dependent on the main Fushimi Shrine in Kyoto.
The Deity in residence is
常磐稲荷大神 Inari no Kami

. Fushimi Inari Taisha 伏見稲荷大社 Kyoto.

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There is also a small replica of the Shrine
Fuji Asama Jinja 富士浅間神社
This kind of Fujizuka 富士塚 mound is rather auspicious in many parts of Tokyo.



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shuin 朱印 stamp


- stamp book



omamori お守り amulets


- - - - - HP of the Shrine
- source : jinjamemo.com... -




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- Reference : 京浜伏見稲荷神社
- Reference : English


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .

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- #keihinfushimiinari #keihininari -
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04/05/2018

Kizumi Jinja Ishikawa

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. Shinto Shrines (jinja 神社) - Introduction .
. kami 神 Shinto deities .
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Kizumi Jinja 木住神社 Kizumi Shrine, Ishikawa
鳳珠郡能登町山田2-40番地 / Noto, Hosu District, Yamada, Ishikawa



- quote
伝説によれば、慶長年間に新田義貞の子孫四郎兵衛義晴当地に居城を構え、家宝の剱を神体として素戔嗚尊を祀り、後に菊理姫命を合祀して新田氏の氏神とし、後には木住部落全体の崇敬するところとなった。昭和21年に山田郷神社より分離し当部落にあった気多神社、度会神社を合祀して、木住神社を創立した。3月28日花祭に鬼討ちと称し、鬼面を描き、参詣人が竹の弓矢で射的した後、白と草の餅で小さい菱餅を作り、太鼓の拍子に合わせて参詣人に撤餅し、その間、有志のものが桃花の枝を持って即興的に踊り、これを花踊りと称していたが今は踊る者がない。
- source : ishikawa-jinjacho.or.jp / 今蔵神社


- - - - - Deities in residence - - - - -
素戔嗚尊 Susanoo no Mikoto
菊理姫命 Kukurihime no Mikoto
伊弉諾命 Izanagi no Mikoto
天照大神 Amaterasu Okami
豊受大神 Toyouke Okami


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Yearly Festivals 年中行事

oni uchi matsuri, oniuchi 鬼打ち祭 Festival of hitting the demons
3月28日 March 28



Spring festival to pray for a good harvest, health and safety of the family.
A painting of saru-oni 猿鬼 Monkey-Demon is hung on a tree in the Shrine compound and then the Shrine parishioners shoot an arrow each at this demon.
After that they take branches with peach blossoms in both hands and perform a funny dance. The whole compound is then filled with laughter.





. saruoni, saru-oni 猿鬼 a Monkey-Deomn Yokai .


. Onipedia 日本の鬼 The Demons of Japan .

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. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .


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- #kizumishrine #oniuchi -
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28/02/2018

Kagutsuchi Homusubi fire

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Kagutsuchi カグツチ / 軻遇突智 Kagu-tsuchi - "incarnation of fire"
Homusubi no Mikoto 火産霊命

Hinokagatsuchi 火之迦具土

He is the main deity in residence at the many
. Atago Jinja 愛宕神社 Atago shrines of Japan .

Kagutsuchi is the patron deity of blacksmiths and ceramic workers.


source : rekihaku-bo/historystation / イザナギとイザナミの国造り

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- quote -
Other names:
Kagutsuchi no mikoto, Hinoyagihayao no kami, Hinokagabiko no kami (Kojiki),
Ho musuhi (Nihongi).

The kami of fire or hi no kami. According to Kojiki and an "alternate writing" transmitted by Nihongi, Izanami suffered mortal burns when giving birth to this kami.
Upon Izanami's death, Izanagi was enraged and cut up the deity with his sword, whereupon Takemikazuchi and other deities were produced from the blood on his sword.
Still other deities were produced from Kagutsuchi's body, and their names all included the element yamatsumi, thus indicating their relation to mountains.
In the Engishiki,
a source which contains the myth, Izanami, in her death throes, bears the water god Mizuhame, instructing her to pacify Kagutsuchi if he should become violent. This story also contains references to traditional fire-fighting tools: gourds for carrying water and wet clay and water reeds for smothering fires.
- reference source : Kadoya Atsushi - Kokugakuin -





Kuraokami, Takaokami 高おかみ神, Kuramitsuha
Three Kami produced from the blood that dripped from Izanagi's sword when he killed the kami of fire, Kagutsuchi.
. Kifune Shrine Kume 貴布弥(きふね)神社 .
岡山県久米郡久米町桑上 Kuwakami village, Kume, Okayama


. 金山彦神 Kanayamabiko, 金山姫 Kanayamabime .
According to Kojiki, these kami were produced from the vomit (taguri) emitted by Izanami as she lay dying following the birth of the kami of fire Kagutsuchi.
The History of Tatara - Kanayago-Kami


. Kifune Jinja 貴船神社 Shrine in Kyoto .
Tamayori-hime 玉依姫, a female water Kami, is venerated here to watch over Kagutsuchi, in a balance of fire and water worship in Kyoto.
The tow other deities enshrined here are Takaokami-no-Kami and Kuraokami-no-Kami.

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- quote -
Kagutsuchi (aka Hi-no-Kagutsuchi) is the Shinto god or kami of fire and is also known as Homusubi. The son of Izanami and Izanagi, the fire god is the father of eight warrior gods and eight mountain gods, amongst others. Such a destructive force as fire in a culture where buildings were typically made of wood and paper resulted in Kagutsuchi becoming an important object of Shinto ritual and a frequent receiver of appeasing offerings.
- Genealogy & Offspring
According to the 8th-century CE Kojiki ('Record of Ancient Things') and Nikon Shoki ('Chronicle of Japan' and also known as the Nihongi), Kagutsuchi-no-kami, to give his full name, was born from Izanami, one of the Shinto creator gods, but such was his fierce heat that he killed his mother in the process. His father Izanagi was not best pleased with this result and so lopped off Kagutsuchi’s head with his great sword, the Ame-no-o-habari-no-kami. From the blood which gushed out over the surrounding rocks and dripped from the sword’s blade and hilt another eight gods were born, all of them powerful swordsmen kami. The two most important of these martial gods are Takemikazuchi-no-kami and Futsunushi-no-kami, with the former being also a thunder god and patron of the martial arts who famously subdued Namazu the giant catfish that lives beneath the earth and causes earthquakes by flipping his tail.

Two other gods born from Kagutsuchi’s blood were Kuraokami-no-kami, who is mentioned in the Manyoshu poem anthology (compiled c. 759 CE) as being a dragon and rain god.
Another is Amatsumikaboshi, the kami of Venus, the Evening Star. Her alternative name is Amenokagasewo.

After Kagutsuchi’s decapitation the story continues and from just about every body part of the fire god, from his left foot to his genitals, eight more gods were born. These were mountain gods which represented different types of mountains such as forested ones, those with moors, those far away, those possessing iron, those which provided passes to adjoining valleys and, of course, volcanoes. The stories of Kagutsuchi which include the creation of iron and swords may well be a mythological explanation for the arrival of iron and superior metal goods via immigrants arriving in Japan from mainland Asia at the beginning of the Yayoi Period (c. 300 BCE or earlier to c. 250 CE), many of whom may well have been warriors.

In an alternative version, or rather an added segment, recorded in the 10th-century CE Engishiki, before she dies Izanami hides away and gives birth to three more gods: the water kami Mizuhame-no-mikoto, the clay princess, the gourd, and the water reed. All four are instructed by their dying mother to watch out for Kagutsuchi and, if necessary, act to pacify him if he ever gets out of hand. The traditional fire-fighting equipment of the ancient Japanese was water, carried in a gourd, to pour on the fire while water reeds and clay were often used to smother it. Even today in some parts of Japan, there is a midwinter ritual where reed bundles are placed in the eaves of roofs so that they are handy if a fire should break out.
- Fire in Shinto Rituals
The Japanese have long since had a great fear of fire and the devastation it can cause, not least because Japanese buildings were traditionally made from highly combustible wood and paper walls with wood shale or grass roofs. Fires have destroyed almost every major ancient building and temple in the ancient cities of Japan over the centuries, and during the Edo period (1603-1868 CE), fires were so frequent at the capital Edo (modern Tokyo) that they were known as 'the flowers of Edo'.

It is not surprising then that ceremonies to appease and ward off Kagutsuchi were a common feature of Shinto ritual. In such rituals and prayers, Kagutsuchi is usually referred to as Homusubi, which translates as 'he who starts fires'. The ancient Japanese even dedicated a twice yearly ceremony to Kagutsuchi, the Ho-shizume-no-matsuri, which was sponsored by the imperial court whose sprawling palace complexes were frequently victim to fires. The ceremony was designed to please the god and ensure he would withhold his terrible flames for another six months. The destructive fire of Kagutsuchi is in contrast to the purifying fire of Shinto rituals, known as kiri-bi, which was traditionally made by rubbing together two pieces of hinoki wood, a type of cypress.

Kagutsuchi is sometimes equated with Atago Gongen, another kami of fire and considered an avatar of the Buddhist figure Jizo.
Strictly speaking, though, Atago Gongen is a more positive figure in Japanese mythology and acts as a protector from fire or a preserver of it.
- source : ancient.eu/Kagutsuchi - Mark Cartwright -


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- Reference : カグツチ
- Reference : kagutsuchi


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .





. Katen, the God of Fire .
Katen 火天 / kajin 火神 the God of Fire


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. Karasu Tengu from the Atago Jinja shrine in Kyoto .


. Sugiyama Sooshoo (Soojoo) 杉山僧正 Sugiyama Sosho (Sojo) .
Sosho is about 3000 years old. He lives in 岩間町愛宕山 Mount Atagoyama in Iwama, Ibaraki.

. Taicho Daishi 泰澄大師 (682 ?683 - 767) .
He practised austerities at 愛宕山 Mount Atago together with En no Gyoja 役小角 En no Ozunu, where they met three Tengu and got special teachings and training.
天狗 白峰大僧正 Tengu Shiramine Daisojo



. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .


....................................................................... Chiba 千葉県 .....

. Mount Takagoyama 高宕山 .
高宕山 The Kanji in the middle, 宕, refers to the cave, and this reminded people of the famous 愛宕山 Atagoyama in Kyoto.
Maybe the Tengu from Atagoyama even came here to visit ? ??



....................................................................... Fukui 福井県 .....

. "fire festival of Atago 愛宕の火祭り .



....................................................................... Fukushima 福島県 .....

. 川中子の愛宕神社 Atago Shrine of Kawanakago .



....................................................................... Miyazaki 宮崎県 .....

. Mount Atagoyama in Osaki 愛宕山のオサキ(尾根) .
and the wind kappa 兵主坊 Hyosubo



....................................................................... Saitama 埼玉県 .....
Chichibu

. 和田神社 Wada Jinja .
with a sanctuary for the 愛宕様 Atago Deity, the 山の神 God of the Mountain.


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. Atago Gongen Densetsu 愛宕権現 伝説 More Legends about Atago Gongen .

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08/01/2018

Hayama Shrine Fukushima

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Hayama Jinja 葉山神社 Hayama Shrine, Soma, Fukushima


source : blogs.yahoo.co.jp/tendomaru...
福島県相馬市馬場野 / Babano, Soma, Fukushima

- - - - - Deitiy in residence - - - - -

. Ooyamatsuminomikoto 大山祇神, 大山積神, 大山津見神 Oyama Tsumi no Mikoto .
Oyamatsumi no Mikoto, Ōyamatsumi - protector of trees and the mountain forest

. Yama no Kami 山の神 God of the Mountain in Fukushima .

The 葉山祠 Hayama shrine is also related to the Soma clan.
Soma Yoshitane 相馬義胤 (1548 - 16365)
He came to live in 馬場野 Babano.

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- quote -
Hayama-gomori - Retreat at Hayama.
A festival held between the fifteenth and the eighteenth day of the eleventh month of the lunar calendar at Kuronuma Shrine, Fukushima City.
According to a local legend, a long time ago, when the nearby hamlet of Kanesawa was being attacked by a giant crab the size of a tatami mat, seven families found shelter at Kuronuma Shrine.
There they received an oracle ( 託宣 takusen / 神託 shintaku) which enabled them to get rid of the crab.
It is said that a giant serpent (orochi) in the Abukuma River was also defeated thanks to a takusen from this shrine. The festival is held to commemorate these two events. Rites of obeisance and making mochi rice cakes are held on the fifteenth.
On the sixteenth, worshippers staying overnight at the small shrines, get naked in order to perform the yoisa rite, a pantomime of rice cultivation.
At dawn on the eighteenth, after having been purified with water, the worshippers climb Mount Hayama to recite ritual incantations (norito). There, an officiant known as the のりわら / ノリワラ noriwara acts as a medium for oracles predicting the weather, harvest and calamities for the coming year.
- source : kokugakuin Mogi Sakae -


黒沼神社 Kuronuma Jinja
福島市松川町金沢 Fukushima, Matsukawa, Kanezawa



- more photos:
- reference source : ameblo.jp/idjericho... -

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相馬郡 Soma district 飯館村 Iitate

Hayama no Kami 葉山の神 Kami of Hayama (羽山の神託)
The Noriwara wears white robes and a white headband and swings a heisoku 幣束 ritual wand.
The villagers built a ritual fire in a place separated with sacred ropes on four green bamboo poles. The Noriwara swings his ritual wand through the flames for purification (hi o shimesu火をしめす). Often the Noriwara himself jumps over the flames.

He answers to all kinds of questions:
Will I have to become a soldier and go to the army?
Will I get ill next year?
When asked, the Noriwara swings his ritual wand heavily up and down and waits till the Kami of Hayama has slipped into his body.
Then he swings the wand up and knees on the floor in reverence (神あがる kami agaru).
Now all present chant a purification prayer:
sange sange rokkon shojo さんげさんげろっこんしょうじょう.

When the Noriwara gets some salt water to drink, he comes back to his sense.
He takes a short rest and then answers to the questions of the next villager.
This ritual lasts the whole night.
At the end the Noriwara swings his wand again through the flames (hi o shimesu 火をしめす).

Then all take the offerings, go to the shrine and have a feast of the food offerings.
The ritual wand can now be placed at the entrance of a horse shed to keep the animals healthy.

The selection of a villager for Noriwara is done with great care.
Once the man had been effective, he will be chosen again and again.
A very clever and learned person is not suited for this sacred post.

If a person does not show respect for the rituals, the Noriwara might call out loud that this person will fall down near the fire.

Once a Noriwara became ill on the day of the rituals and could not attend. One of the villagers assembled at the shrine begun to pray and then became possessed by the Kami.
He jumped up and down, up and down.

Once a man called the oracle of the のりわら Noriwara a lie and laughed loud.
On the afternoon of this day it begun to rain and there was great flooding.


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福島市 Fukushima city 松川町 Matsukawa
Matuskawa is a small town outside of Fukushima City,

hayama no shintaku 羽山の神託 divination at Hayama
Kami from other mountains sometimes come for a visit and the Noriwara has to welcome them and see them off, one after the other.
Sometimes if Hayama no Kami can not show, they can take his turn during the oracle.
Sometimes it is 稲荷 Inari san, sometimes 水神 Suiji, the Kami of Water.

On Mount Hayama in 金沢 Kanezawa hamlet, people stay and pray for divination:
How will the weather be? How will the harvest turn out?
According to the divination, they make their plans for the coming year.

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One more 葉山神社 Hayama Jinja in Koriyama

福島県郡山市大槻町葉山39 / Fukushima, Koriyama, Otsukimachi, Hayama


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- reference : Nichibun Yokai Database -


. Shrine, Shinto Shrine (jinja 神社) - Introduction .

. kami 神 Shinto deities - ABC-LIST - .


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